Дуглас макартур цитаты

“It is part of the general pattern of misguided policy that our country is now geared to an arms economy which was bred in an artificially induced psychosis of war hysteria and nurtured upon an incessant propaganda of fear.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

Speech to the Michigan legislature, in Lansing, Michigan (15 May 1952), published in General MacArthur Speeches and Reports 1908-1964 (2000) by Edward T. Imparato, p. 206, much of this was used in speeches of 1951, as quoted in The Twenty-year Revolution from Roosevelt to Eisenhower (1954) by Chesly Manly, p. 3, and Total Insecurity : The Myth Of American Omnipotence (2004) by Carol Brightman, p. 182<!—
Контексте: It is part of the general pattern of misguided policy that our country is now geared to an arms economy which was bred in an artificially induced psychosis of war hysteria and nurtured upon an incessant propaganda of fear. While such an economy may produce a sense of seeming prosperity for the moment, it rests on an illusionary foundation of complete unreliability and renders among our political leaders almost a greater fear of peace than is their fear of war.

“There is no substitute for victory.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

Letter to Representative Joseph W. Martin, Jr., (20 March 1951); read to the House by Martin on April 5.
Вариант: In war there is no substitute for victory.
Контексте: It seems strangely difficult for some to realize that here in Asia is where the Communist conspirators have elected to make their play for global conquest, and that we have joined the issue thus raised on the battlefield; that here we fight Europe’s war with arms while the diplomats there still fight it with words; that if we lose the war to communism in Asia the fall of Europe is inevitable, win it and Europe most probably would avoid war and yet preserve freedom. As you pointed out, we must win. There is no substitute for victory.

“I have constantly called for the new political decisions essential to a solution.
Efforts have been made to distort my position. It has been said, in effect, that I was a warmonger. Nothing could be further from the truth. I know war as few other men now living know it, and nothing to me is more revolting. I have long advocated its complete abolition, as its very destructiveness on both friend and foe has rendered it useless as a means of settling international disputes. … But once war is forced upon us, there is no other alternative than to apply every available means to bring it to a swift end.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

1950s, Farewell address to Congress (1951)
Контексте: We could hold in Korea by constant maneuver and in an approximate area where our supply line advantages were in balance with the supply line disadvantages of the enemy, but we could hope at best for only an indecisive campaign with its terrible and constant attrition upon our forces if the enemy utilized its full military potential. I have constantly called for the new political decisions essential to a solution.
Efforts have been made to distort my position. It has been said, in effect, that I was a warmonger. Nothing could be further from the truth. I know war as few other men now living know it, and nothing to me is more revolting. I have long advocated its complete abolition, as its very destructiveness on both friend and foe has rendered it useless as a means of settling international disputes. … But once war is forced upon us, there is no other alternative than to apply every available means to bring it to a swift end.

“Men since the beginning of time have sought peace.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

1940s, Victory broadcast (1945)
Контексте: Men since the beginning of time have sought peace. Various methods through the ages have been attempted to devise an international process to prevent or settle disputes between nations. From the very start workable methods were found in so far as individual citizens were concerned, but the mechanics of an instrumentality of larger international scope have never been successful. Military alliances, balances of power, Leagues of Nations, all in turn failed, leaving the only path to be by way of the crucible of war. The utter destructiveness of war now blocks out this alternative. We have had our last chance. If we will not devise some greater and more equitable system, Armageddon will be at our door.

“Today, freedom is on the offensive, democracy is on the march.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

1940s, Victory broadcast (1945)
Контексте: We stand in Tokyo today reminiscent of our countryman, Commodore Perry, ninety-two years ago. His purpose was to bring to Japan an era of enlightenment and progress, by lifting the veil of isolation to the friendship, trade, and commerce of the world. But alas the knowledge thereby gained of western science was forged into an instrument of oppression and human enslavement. Freedom of expression, freedom of action, even freedom of thought were denied through appeal to superstition, and through the application of force. We are committed by the Potsdam Declaration of principles to see that the Japanese people are liberated from this condition of slavery. … To the Pacific basin has come the vista of a new emancipated world. Today, freedom is on the offensive, democracy is on the march. Today, in Asia as well as in Europe, unshackled peoples are tasting the full sweetness of liberty, the relief from fear.

“Today the guns are silent. A great tragedy has ended. A great victory has been won.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

1940s, Victory broadcast (1945)
Контексте: Today the guns are silent. A great tragedy has ended. A great victory has been won. The skies no longer rain with death — the seas bear only commerce — men everywhere walk upright in the sunlight. The entire world lies quietly at peace. The holy mission has been completed. And in reporting this to you, the people, I speak for the thousands of silent lips, forever stilled among the jungles and the beaches and in the deep waters of the Pacific which marked the way.

“If we will not devise some greater and more equitable system, Armageddon will be at our door.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

1940s, Victory broadcast (1945)
Контексте: Men since the beginning of time have sought peace. Various methods through the ages have been attempted to devise an international process to prevent or settle disputes between nations. From the very start workable methods were found in so far as individual citizens were concerned, but the mechanics of an instrumentality of larger international scope have never been successful. Military alliances, balances of power, Leagues of Nations, all in turn failed, leaving the only path to be by way of the crucible of war. The utter destructiveness of war now blocks out this alternative. We have had our last chance. If we will not devise some greater and more equitable system, Armageddon will be at our door.

“Talk of imminent threat to our national security through the application of external force is pure nonsense.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

Speech to the Michigan legislature, in Lansing, Michigan (15 May 1952), published in General MacArthur Speeches and Reports 1908-1964 (2000) by Edward T. Imparato, p. 206; part of this was also used in a speech in Boston, as quoted in TIME magazine (6 August 1951) http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,856843,00.html
Контексте: Talk of imminent threat to our national security through the application of external force is pure nonsense. Our threat is from the insidious forces working from within which have already so drastically altered the character of our free institutions — those institutions we proudly called the American way of life.

“Americans never quit.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

Comment as president of the American Olympic committee when the manager of the American boxing team in the 1928 Olympic games wanted to withdraw the team because of what he thought was an unfair decision against an American boxer; reported in The New York Times (August 9, 1928), p. 13.
1920s

“In the last fifteen days of the war, my Fifth and Seventh Air Forces flew 6,732 sorties against Kyushu alone. Thus, with a deafening roar of blasting bombs, Kenney’s Far East air forces culminated their blows against Japan. During the last seven and a half months of the war, their planes destroyed 2,846,932 tons of shipping and 1,375 enemy aircraft, dropped 100,000 tons of bombs, and flew over 150,00 sorties.”

—  Douglas MacArthur

Источник: Reminiscences (1964), p. 265


  • От Аноним

    Лучший мир должен основываться на вере и понимании.


  • От Аноним

    Генерал такой же хороший или такой же плохой, как и его подчиненные войска.


  • От Аноним

    Возраст морщит тело. Отказ от морщин в душе.


  • От Аноним

    Хороший солдат, независимо от того, возглавляет ли он взвод или армию, должен смотреть назад и вперед, но он должен думать только вперед.


  • От Аноним

    Дома всегда было какое-то ужасное зло или какая-то чудовищная иностранная сила, которая собиралась нас поглотить, если бы мы не слепо сплотились за ней.


  • От Аноним

    Американцы никогда не уходят.


  • От Аноним

    Помимо врожденного понимания тактических концепций, великий тренер должен обладать необходимыми атрибутами лидерства, которые превращают людей в сплоченную, боевую команду с непобедимой волей к победе.


  • От Аноним

    Солдат лает и стонет, потеет и трудится, рычит и ругается, а в конце умирает.


  • От Аноним

    Поверьте мне, сэр, никогда не проходит ночь, будь я очень уставшим, но я читаю Слово Божье перед тем, как лечь спать.


  • От Аноним

    Пустые патроны никогда не должны использоваться против толпы, и при этом не должно быть залпа по головам толпы, даже если существует небольшая опасность причинения вреда людям в тылу. Такие вещи будут расцениваться как признание слабости или попытка блефовать, и может принести больше вреда, чем пользы .


  • От Аноним

    По профессии я солдат, и я горжусь этим фактом, но я горд, бесконечно горд, чтобы быть отцом. Солдат разрушает, чтобы строить; отец только строит, а не разрушает. У того есть потенциальные возможности смерти; другой воплощает творение и жизнь .


  • От Аноним

    Соревновательные виды спорта поддерживают в нас дух и жизненную силу. Спорт учит сильных знать, когда они слабы, и храбрых, чтобы сражаться, когда боится; овладеть собой, прежде чем мы попытаемся овладеть другими; научиться смеяться, но никогда не забывать, как плакать; и придать мужеству преимущество над робостью .


  • От Аноним

    Если бы у меня была только линия век, и, следовательно, зачисление вклада в дело укрепления мира, я бы отдал всю честь, оказанную войной.


  • От Аноним

    » Долг, Честь, Страна «- эти три священных слова благоговейно диктуют, кем ты должен быть, кем ты можешь быть, кем ты будешь. Они — твой объединяющий аргумент, чтобы набраться смелости, когда смелость кажется неудачной, вернуть веру, когда Кажется, у веры мало оснований, чтобы создавать надежду, когда надежда становится несчастной .


  • От Аноним

    Ожидайте, что только 5% разведданных будут точными. Уловка хорошего командира состоит в том, чтобы выделить 5%.


  • От Аноним

    Мало имен оставило более сильный отпечаток на страницах истории американского времени, чем Тай Кобб … он, кажется, понял, что в соревнованиях по бейсболу, как и в войне, оборонительная стратегия никогда не давала окончательного результата». победа .


  • От Аноним

    Масонство охватывает высочайшие моральные законы и выдержит испытание любой системой этики или философии, когда-либо принятой для возвышения человека.


  • От Аноним

    «С Дальнего Востока я посылаю тебе одну мысль, одну единственную идею — написанную красным на каждом плацдарме от Австралии до Токио -« ничто не заменит победу!


  • От Аноним

    Глобальная война стала монстром Франкенштейна, угрожая уничтожить обе стороны.


  • От Аноним

    Здесь сосредоточены надежды, чаяния и вера всей человеческой расы. Я не выступаю здесь в качестве сторонника какого-либо партизанского дела, потому что эти проблемы имеют фундаментальное значение и выходят далеко за рамки пристрастного рассмотрения. Они должны быть решены на основе Наивысшая плоскость национального интереса, если наш курс должен быть обоснованным и наше будущее защищено. Поэтому я верю, что вы сделаете все возможное, чтобы я получил то, что, как я должен сказать, исключительно выражает взвешенную точку зрения такого же американца .


  • От Аноним

    Таким образом, он пожинает все плоды своего труда и труда благодаря стимулу свободного предпринимательства, чтобы максимизировать свои усилия по увеличению производства. Представляя более половины всего населения Японии, работники сельского хозяйства стали непобедимым препятствием для продвижения вперед. социалистических идей, которые бы отнесли все к унижению государственного рабства .


  • От Аноним

    Какими бы ужасными ни были события войны, солдат, призванный предложить и отдать свою жизнь за свою страну, является благороднейшим развитием человечества.


  • От Аноним

    Я обращаюсь к тебе не с злобой и не с горечью в угасающих сумерках жизни, имея в виду только одну цель: служить своей стране.


  • От Аноним

    Я обращаюсь к вам ни с злостью, ни с горечью в угасающих сумерках жизни, имея в виду только одну цель: служить моей стране. Проблемы носят глобальный характер и настолько взаимосвязаны, что позволяют рассматривать проблемы одного сектора, не обращая внимания на проблемы другого. Это всего лишь попытка устроить катастрофу для всего. Хотя Азию обычно называют Воротами в Европу, не менее верно то, что Европа — это Ворота в Азию, и широкое влияние этого человека не может не сказаться на Другие.


  • От Аноним

    Я считаю, что все усилия современного общества должны быть сосредоточены на стремлении объявить войну вне закона как метод решения проблем между народами.


  • От Аноним

    Я вышел из Батаана и вернусь!


  • От Аноним


  • От Аноним

    Я не могу вспомнить параллели в истории, когда великая нация, недавно воевавшая, так отличалась от своего бывшего командующего врагами


  • От Аноним

    Если бы у меня было еще одно подразделение, такое как это первое подразделение морской пехоты, я мог бы выиграть эту войну.


  • От Аноним

    Если мы не будем придумывать какую-то более справедливую систему, Армагеддон будет у наших дверей.


  • От Аноним

    Я полностью уверен в окончательном успехе нашего общего дела; но для успеха в современной войне нужно нечто большее, чем смелость и готовность умереть: это требует тщательной подготовки.


  • От Аноним

    Я только что вернулся с посещения морских пехотинцев на фронте, и в мире нет лучшей боевой организации!


  • От Аноним

    У меня есть одна критика по поводу негритянских войск, которые сражались под моим командованием в Корейской войне. Они не прислали мне их достаточно.


  • От Аноним

    Я вернулся. По милости Всемогущего Бога наши силы снова стоят на филиппинской земле.


  • От Аноним

    Я знаю, что эта операция будет чем-то вроде вертолета. Но Первая дивизия морской пехоты выиграет войну, высадившись в Инчоне.


  • От Аноним

    Я знаю войну, как мало кто из ныне живущих людей знает ее, и ничто для меня не является более отвратительным. Я давно выступал за ее полную отмену, поскольку ее разрушительная сила как для друга, так и для врага сделала ее бесполезной в качестве средства урегулирования международных споров … Но когда нам навязывают войну, нет другой альтернативы, кроме как применить все доступные средства, чтобы быстро ее положить .


  • От Аноним

    Я вернусь, как только смогу, со всем, что смогу. А пока ты должен держаться!


  • От Аноним

    Во многих ситуациях, которые казались отчаянными, артиллерия была самым важным фактором.


  • От Аноним

    В моих снах я снова слышу грохот орудий, грохот мушкетов, странное, скорбное бормотание на поле битвы.


  • От Аноним

    Ни в одной другой профессии наказания за использование неподготовленного персонала не могут быть такими ужасными или бесповоротными, как в армии.


  • От Аноним

    Короче говоря, для американской жизни будущего характерны свобода или рабство, сила или слабость? Ответ должен быть ясным и однозначным, если мы хотим избежать ловушек, к которым мы сейчас идем с такой уверенностью. Во многих уважает его не в какой-либо догме политической философии, а в тех неизменных заповедях, которые лежат в основе Десяти заповедей .


  • От Аноним

    В мощном и почти безграничном потенциале американской промышленности — блеске и твердой решимости ее лидеров; мастерстве, энергии и патриотизме ее рабочих — была сварена почти неприступная защита от злых замыслов любого, кто будет угрожать безопасность американского континента. Это действительно самый убедительный и убедительный аргумент, который до сих пор развивался, чтобы обуздать безответственность тех, кто безрассудно обрушит на добрых и миролюбивых народов всех народов земли катастрофу тотальной войны .


  • От Аноним

    В этой ситуации жизненно важно, чтобы наша собственная страна ориентировала свою политику в соответствии с этим базовым эволюционным условием, а не придерживалась курса, слепого к реальности, что колониальная эра уже прошла, и азиатские народы жаждут права формировать свои собственные Свободная судьба. Сейчас они ищут дружеского руководства, понимания и поддержки, а не властного руководства, достоинства равенства, а не позора подчинения .


  • От Аноним

    В войне, как она ведется сейчас, с огромными потерями с обеих сторон, обе стороны проиграют. Это форма взаимного самоубийства.


  • От Аноним

    На войне, действительно, ничто не может заменить победу.


  • От Аноним

    На войне ничто не заменит победу.


  • От Аноним

    На войне, когда командир настолько теряет рассудок и перспективу, что не понимает зависимости оружия от божественного руководства, он больше не заслуживает победы.


  • От Аноним

    Я вижу, что флагшток все еще стоит. Пусть твои войска поднимут цвета до своего пика, и пусть враг их не потянет.


  • От Аноним

    Я стою на этой трибуне с чувством глубокого смирения и большой гордости — смирения под тяжестью тех великих американских архитекторов нашей истории, которые стояли здесь передо мной; гордость за то, что этот дом законодательных дебатов представляет свободу человека в самая чистая форма, которая еще разработана .


  • От Аноним

    Полагаю, это стало частью моей души. Это символ моей жизни. Что бы я ни делал, это действительно важно, я уже носил его. Когда придет время, оно будет в этом что я отправляюсь в путь. Какую большую честь могут получить американец и солдат?

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Последнее обновление: 14 марта 2024 г.

Американцы никогда не сдаются.

Вас помнят за правила, которые вы нарушаете.

Сотвори мне сына, Господи, достаточно сильного, чтобы понять, когда он слаб, и достаточно храброго, чтобы встретиться с самим собой, когда он боится, того, кто будет гордым и непреклонным в честном поражении и смиренным и кротким в победе.

Жизнь – это живой процесс становления. — © Дуглас Макартур

Жизнь – это живой процесс становления.

Лучший мир появится на основе веры и понимания.

Если бы через столетие я имел хотя бы одну строчку в знак признания вклада в продвижение мира, я бы отдал все почести, оказанные войной.

Я беспокоюсь за безопасность нашей великой нации; не столько из-за какой-то угрозы извне, сколько из-за коварных сил, действующих изнутри.

Я много раз смотрел в глаза этому старому негодяю смерти, но на этот раз я думаю, что он держит меня на веревках.

Возраст сморщивает тело. Уход сморщивает душу.

Частью общей модели ошибочной политики является то, что наша страна теперь ориентирована на экономику вооружений, которая была выращена в искусственно вызванном психозе военной истерии и взращена на непрекращающейся пропаганде страха.

Часть американской мечты — жить долго и умереть молодым. Только те американцы, которые готовы умереть за свою страну, способны жить.

В войне ты побеждаешь или проигрываешь, живешь или умираешь — и разница всего в ресничке.

Всегда было какое-то ужасное зло дома или какая-то чудовищная чужая сила, которая собиралась поглотить нас, если мы слепо не сплачивались за нее.

Я знал войну так, как мало кто из ныне живущих знает ее. Он очень разрушительен как для друзей, так и для врагов, что сделало его бесполезным в качестве средства урегулирования международных споров.

Как старый солдат из баллады, я заканчиваю свою военную карьеру и просто исчезаю, старый солдат, который пытался исполнить свой долг, как Бог дал ему свет, чтобы увидеть этот долг. До свидания.

В войне нет замены победе. — © Дуглас Макартур

В войне нет замены победе.

Мы не отступаем — мы наступаем в другом направлении.

Старые солдаты никогда не умирают; они просто исчезают.

Генерал настолько хорош или настолько плох, насколько его делают войска под его командованием.

Я полагаю, что в каком-то смысле это стало частью моей души. Это символ моей жизни. Что бы я ни сделал, что действительно имеет значение, я надел это. Когда придет время, именно в этом я буду путешествовать дальше. Какая большая честь может быть оказана американцу и солдату?

Только те достойны жить, кто не боится умереть.

Мир находится в постоянном заговоре против храбрых. Это вековая борьба: рев толпы с одной стороны и голос совести с другой.

Наше правительство держало нас в постоянном страхе, держало в постоянном панике патриотического рвения, крича о чрезвычайном положении в стране.

Долг, Честь, Родина. Эти три священных слова благоговейно диктуют, кем вы должны быть, кем вы можете быть, кем вы будете.

Они умирали жестоко, эти дикари — как раненые волки в безвыходном положении. Они были грязными, паршивыми и вонючими. И я любил их.

На этой земле нет безопасности; есть только возможность.

Фатально вступать в любую войну без воли к ее победе.

Никогда не отдавайте приказ, который нельзя выполнить.

Солдат больше всех молится о мире, ибо именно солдат должен страдать и нести самые глубокие раны и шрамы войны.

Нельзя вести войну в нынешних условиях без поддержки общественного мнения, которое в огромной степени формируется прессой и другими формами пропаганды.

Во сне я снова слышу грохот орудий, треск ружей, странный, заунывный ропот поля боя.

Я только что вернулся из посещения морской пехоты на фронте, и нет на свете более прекрасной боевой организации!

Мое первое воспоминание — это сигнал горна.

Самая большая удача — это удача, которую вы делаете для себя.

Наша страна сейчас ориентируется на экономику вооружений, взращенную на искусственно наведенном психозе военной истерии и непрекращающейся пропаганде страха.

У НАС БЫЛ ПОСЛЕДНИЙ ШАНС. ПРОБЛЕМА СЕЙЧАС В ОСНОВНОМ ТЕОЛОГИЧЕСКАЯ, И ВКЛЮЧАЕТ ДУХОВНОСТЬ И СОВЕРШЕНСТВОВАНИЕ ЧЕЛОВЕЧЕСКОГО ХАРАКТЕРА. ЭТО ДОЛЖНО БЫТЬ ОТ ДУХА, ЕСЛИ МЫ ХОТИМ СПАСТЬ ПЛОТЬ.

По профессии я военный и горжусь этим фактом. Но я горжусь — бесконечно горжусь — тем, что я отец. Солдат разрушает, чтобы строить; отец только строит, никогда не разрушает. У одного есть потенциал смерти; другой воплощает творение и жизнь. И хотя полчища смерти могучи, батальоны жизни еще могущественнее. Я надеюсь, что мой сын, когда я уйду, будет помнить меня не с поля боя, а дома, повторяя с ним нашу простую ежедневную молитву «Отче наш, сущий на небесах».

Как только война навязана нам, нет другой альтернативы, кроме как применить все доступные средства, чтобы быстро положить ей конец. Самой целью войны является победа, а не длительная нерешительность.

Никто не стареет, просто прожив несколько лет. Люди стареют, только отказываясь от своих идеалов. Годы могут сморщить кожу, но отказ от интереса сморщит душу. Беспокойство, сомнение, неуверенность в себе, страх и отчаяние; это долгие-долгие годы, которые склоняют голову и обращают растущий дух обратно в прах. Сколько бы вам ни было лет, в сердце каждого существа есть любовь к чуду, бесстрашный вызов событиям, неизменное детское стремление к тому, что будет дальше, радость и игра жизни.

От того, кому много дано, много и требуется. Дело не в том, падешь ли ты, а встанешь ли ты. Альтернативы победе нет. — © Дуглас Макартур

От того, кому много дано, много и требуется. Дело не в том, падешь ли ты, а встанешь ли ты. Альтернативы победе нет.

Ни один человек не имеет права на блага свободы, если он не будет бдителен в ее сохранении.

Наше правительство держало нас в постоянном страхе, держало в постоянном панике патриотического рвения, крича о серьезном национальном чрезвычайном положении. Всегда было какое-то ужасное зло дома или какая-то чудовищная иностранная сила, которая собиралась поглотить нас, если мы слепо не сплачивались за нее, предоставляя требуемые непомерные средства. Тем не менее, оглядываясь назад, кажется, что этих бедствий никогда не было, кажется, что они никогда не были вполне реальными.

Проблемы, с которыми сегодня сталкивается нация, четко определены и настолько фундаментальны, что напрямую затрагивают само выживание Республики. Собираемся ли мы сохранить религиозную основу нашего происхождения, нашего роста и нашего прогресса или поддадимся коварным атакам атеистических или других антирелигиозных сил? Собираемся ли мы сохранить наш нынешний курс к государственному социализму с коммунизмом сразу за его пределами или повернуть вспять нынешнюю тенденцию и восстановить наше наследие свободы и свободы?

Молодость — это не совсем время жизни; это состояние ума. Никто не стареет, просто прожив несколько лет. Люди стареют, отказываясь от своих идеалов. Вы так же молоды, как ваша вера, так же стары, как ваши сомнения; молод, как твоя уверенность в себе, так же стар, как твой страх; так же молод, как твоя надежда, так же стар, как твое отчаяние.

Даже когда стучится возможность, мужчина все равно должен встать со своего места и открыть дверь.

Составьте хороший план, реализуйте его энергично и сделайте это сегодня.

Солдат больше всех людей молится за мир, ибо он должен страдать и переносить глубочайшие раны и шрамы войны.

Враг впереди нас, враг позади нас, враг справа и слева от нас. На этот раз им не уйти!

Правила в основном созданы для того, чтобы их нарушать, и слишком часто ленивый может спрятаться за ними.

Есть люди, которые по разным причинам умиротворяют Красный Китай. Они слепы к ясному уроку истории, потому что история с безошибочным акцентом учит, что умиротворение ведет к новой, еще более кровавой войне. Он не указывает ни на один случай, когда эта цель оправдала бы это средство, когда умиротворение привело бы к чему-то большему, чем фиктивный мир. Подобно шантажу, он закладывает основу для новых и все более значительных требований до тех пор, пока, как и в шантаже, насилие не становится единственной другой альтернативой.

Оптимизм — это отрицание, так что смотрите в лицо фактам и двигайтесь дальше — © Дуглас Макартур

Оптимизм — это отрицание, так что смотрите в лицо фактам и двигайтесь дальше.

«Долг, Честь, Страна» — эти три священных слова благоговейно диктуют, каким ты должен быть, каким ты можешь быть, каким ты будешь. Они являются вашей объединяющей точкой, чтобы обрести мужество, когда кажется, что мужество подводит, восстановить веру, когда кажется, что для веры мало оснований, вселить надежду, когда надежда становится безнадежной.

История не знает ни одного прецедента, когда бы народы, подверженные моральному разложению, не перешли в политический и экономический упадок. Произошло либо духовное пробуждение для преодоления морального падения, либо прогрессирующее ухудшение, ведущее к окончательной национальной катастрофе.

Тот, кто сказал, что перо сильнее меча, явно никогда не сталкивался с автоматическим оружием.

Разговоры о неминуемой угрозе нашей национальной безопасности в результате применения внешней силы — чистый вздор. Наша угроза исходит от коварных сил, действующих изнутри, которые уже так радикально изменили характер наших свободных институтов — тех институтов, которые мы с гордостью называли американским образом жизни.

Дайте мне десять тысяч филиппинских солдат, и я завоюю мир.

У настоящего лидера есть уверенность, чтобы оставаться в одиночестве, мужество, чтобы принимать трудные решения, и сострадание, чтобы прислушиваться к нуждам других. Он не ставит перед собой задачу быть лидером, но становится им благодаря уравновешенности своих действий и цельности своего намерения.

Готовность – залог успеха и победы.

Остерегайся не врага «извне», а врага «внутри».

Дуглас Макартур окончил Вест-Пойнт, когда шла Первая и Вторая мировые войны.

Отец Дугласа Макартура был армейским офицером. Неудивительно, что он стал одним из величайших военачальников Америки и фельдмаршалом филиппинской армии.

У него были разногласия по поводу того, как вести войну в Корее, и это было одним из событий, которые привели его к успеху. Дуглас Макартур хотел начать наступление на Китайскую Народную Республику, которая помогала Северной Корее. К сожалению, президент Трумэн не согласился.

При этом Дуглас Макартур был уволен из армии. Однако вскоре после этого Америка снова приветствовала его парадами по городам.

Цитаты Дугласа Макартура о лидерстве

Вот несколько цитат Дугласа Макартура о лидерстве, которые вас вдохновят.

«Долг, Честь, Родина. Эти три священных слова благоговейно диктуют, кем вы должны быть, кем вы можете быть, кем вы будете».

«Настоящий лидер уверен в себе, чтобы оставаться в одиночестве».

«Генерал настолько хорош или настолько плох, насколько его делают войска под его командованием».

«Лучший лидер тот, у кого хватает ума выбирать хороших людей».

«Лидерство — это способность превзойти момент и предвидеть будущее».

«В войне ты побеждаешь или проигрываешь, живешь или умираешь — и разница всего лишь в ресничке».

«Никогда не сдавайся. Никогда не сдавайся. Никогда никогда никогда.»

«Лидер должен быть активным агентом, а не пассивным отражателем общественного мнения».

«Лидерство — это искусство стратегически возможного».

«Лидерство — это искусство заставить кого-то сделать то, что вы хотите, потому что он хочет это сделать».

«Возраст сморщивает тело. Уход сморщивает душу».

Цитаты Дугласа Макартура о войне

Вот несколько суровых истин о войне, которые вам следует усвоить.

«Солдат больше всех молится о мире, ибо именно солдат должен страдать и нести самые глубокие раны и шрамы войны».

«Я знал войну так, как мало кто из ныне живущих знает ее».

«Разрушительность военного потенциала благодаря прогрессивным научным открытиям фактически достигла точки, которая пересматривает традиционные концепции войны».

«Люди с незапамятных времен искали мира»

«Если бы через столетие у меня была хоть одна строчка в знак признания вклада в продвижение мира, я бы отдал все почести, оказанные войной».

«На войне нет замены победе».

«Сегодня пушки молчат. Великая трагедия закончилась. Одержана великая победа…

«Тот, кто сказал, что перо сильнее меча, очевидно, никогда не сталкивался с автоматическим оружием».

«Солдат — это армия. Нет армии лучше, чем ее солдаты».

«Военные союзы, балансы сил, лиги наций — все, в свою очередь, потерпело неудачу, оставив единственный путь — пройти через горнило войны».

«Народ Филиппин: я вернулся. Милостью Всемогущего Бога наши силы снова стоят на филиппинской земле — земле, освященной кровью двух наших народов».

«Разговоры о непосредственной угрозе нашей национальной безопасности в результате применения внешней силы — чистая чепуха».

«Когда нам навязывают войну, нет другой альтернативы, кроме как применить все доступные средства, чтобы быстро положить ей конец. Самой целью войны является победа, а не длительная нерешительность».

«Историю неудач войны можно описать двумя словами: слишком поздно».

«Дайте мне десять тысяч филиппинских солдат, и я завоюю мир».

Дуглас Макартур Цитаты о жизни

Эти цитаты Дугласа Макартура научат вас одной или двум вещам о жизни.

«Я усвоил один из горьких уроков жизни: никогда не пытайтесь вернуть прошлое, огонь превратится в пепел».

«На этой земле нет безопасности; есть только возможность».

«Как старый солдат из баллады, я заканчиваю свою военную карьеру и просто исчезаю, старый солдат, который пытался исполнить свой долг, как Бог дал ему свет, чтобы увидеть этот долг. До свидания.»

«Ни один человек не имеет права на блага свободы, если он не будет бдителен в ее сохранении».

Дуглас Макартур цитаты о мудрости и мужестве

Изучите эти цитаты Дугласа Макартура о мудрости и мужестве.

«Мир находится в постоянном заговоре против храбрых. Это вековая борьба: рев толпы с одной стороны и голос совести с другой».

«Старые солдаты никогда не умирают; они просто исчезают».

«Лучший мир появится на основе веры и понимания».

«Я беспокоюсь за безопасность нашей великой нации; не столько из-за какой-то угрозы извне, сколько из-за коварных сил, действующих изнутри».

Could I have but a line a century hence crediting a contribution to the advance of peace, I would gladly yield every honor which has been accorded me in war.

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (26 January 1880 – 5 April 1964) was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater during World War II, and in the Korean War. He received the Medal of Honor for his service in the Philippines Campaign, which made him and his father Arthur MacArthur, Jr., the first father and son to be awarded the medal. He was one of only five men ever to rise to the rank of General of the Army in the US Army, and the only man ever to become a field marshal in the Philippine Army.

Quotes[edit]

I have returned.
«Duty, Honor, Country» — those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be.
They are your rallying point to build courage when courage seems to fail, to regain faith when there seems to be little cause for faith, to create hope when hope becomes forlorn.
Americans never quit.
I know war as few other men now living know it, and nothing to me is more revolting. I have long advocated its complete abolition, as its very destructiveness on both friend and foe has rendered it useless as a means of settling international disputes … But once war is forced upon us, there is no other alternative than to apply every available means to bring it to a swift end.
War’s very object is victory, not prolonged indecision. In war there is no substitute for victory.
We have known the bitterness of defeat and the exultation of triumph, and from both we have learned there can be no turning back. We must go forward to preserve in peace what we won in war.
The magnificence of the courage and fortitude of the Korean people defies description.
They have chosen to risk death rather than slavery.
Sentimentalism has muddled many problems, has settled none. Intellect is a man’s only hope for improvement over his present state.
High honors have come my way, but I shall always believe that my greatest honor was being a West Point graduate. The Military Academy has taught me many things, some of them not within the covers of books or written by any man.
As I was leaving the hotel this morning, a doorman asked me, «Where are you headed, General?» and when I replied, «West Point,» he remarked, «Beautiful place. Have you ever been there before?»
  • It was close; but that’s the way it is in war. You win or lose, live or die — and the difference is just an eyelash.
    • To Gen. Richard Sutherland after their flight over Japanese held territory to reach Australia (17 March 1942), as quoted in MacArthur and the War Against Japan (1944) by Frazier Hunt, p. 71
  • I came out of Bataan and I shall return!
    • While transferring trains at Terowie, South Australia regarding the Battle of Philippines (20 March 1942) [specific citation needed]
  • I said, to the people of the Philippines whence I came, I shall return. Tonight, I repeat those words: I shall return!
    • After his arrival in Australia from the Philippines (30 March 1942)
  • I have returned. By the grace of Almighty God, our forces stand again on Philippine soil.
    • On landing in Leyte, Philippines (20 October 1944)
  • I see that the flagpole still stands. Have your troops hoist the colors to its peak, and let no enemy ever haul them down.
    • To Colonel George M. Jones and the 503rd Regimental Combat Team, who recaptured Corregidor (2 March 1945), as quoted in Bureau of Navigation News Bulletin (1945), p. 40
  • It seems strangely difficult for some to realize that here in Asia is where the Communist conspirators have elected to make their play for global conquest, and that we have joined the issue thus raised on the battlefield; that here we fight Europe’s war with arms while the diplomats there still fight it with words; that if we lose the war to communism in Asia the fall of Europe is inevitable, win it and Europe most probably would avoid war and yet preserve freedom. As you pointed out, we must win. There is no substitute for victory.
    • Letter to Representative Joseph W. Martin, Jr., (20 March 1951); read to the House by Martin on April 5.
  • I shall raise my voice as loud and as often as I believe it to be in the interest of the American people. I shall dedicate all of my energies to restoring to American life those immutable principles and ideals which your forebears and mine handed down to us in sacred trust. I shall assist in the regaining of that moral base for both public and private life which will restore the people’s faith in the integrity of public institutions and the private faith of every man in the integrity of his neighbor.
    I shall set my course to the end that no man need fear to speak the truth. I could not do less, for the opportunities for service my country has given me and the honors it has conferred upon me have imposed an obligation which is not discharged by the termination of public service.
    Much that I have seen since my return to my native land after an absence of many years has filled me with immeasurable satisfaction and pride. Our material progress has been little short of phenomenal.
    It has established an eminence in material strength so far in advance of any other nation or combination of nations that talk of imminent threat to our national security through the application of external force is pure nonsense.
    It is not of any external threat that I concern myself but rather of insidious forces working from within which have already so drastically altered the character of our free institutions — those institutions which formerly we hailed as something beyond question or challenge — those institutions we proudly called the American way of life.
    • Address to the Massachusetts legislature, Boston, Massachusetts (25 July 1951), as published in The General and the President (1951), by Richard Halworth Rovere; also in Time (6 August 1951), and General MacArthur Speeches and Reports 1908-1964 (2000) by Ed Imparato, p. 180
    • Variant:
    • Talk of imminent threat to our national security through the application of external force is pure nonsense. Our threat is from the insidious forces working from within which have already so drastically altered the character of our free institutions — those institutions we proudly called the American way of life.
      • Speech to the Michigan legislature, in Lansing, Michigan (15 May 1952), published in General MacArthur Speeches and Reports 1908-1964 (2000) by Edward T. Imparato, p. 206
  • It is part of the general pattern of misguided policy that our country is now geared to an arms economy which was bred in an artificially induced psychosis of war hysteria and nurtured upon an incessant propaganda of fear. While such an economy may produce a sense of seeming prosperity for the moment, it rests on an illusionary foundation of complete unreliability and renders among our political leaders almost a greater fear of peace than is their fear of war.
    • Speech to the Michigan legislature, in Lansing, Michigan (15 May 1952), published in General MacArthur Speeches and Reports 1908-1964 (2000) by Edward T. Imparato, p. 206, much of this was used in speeches of 1951, as quoted in The Twenty-year Revolution from Roosevelt to Eisenhower (1954) by Chesly Manly, p. 3, and Total Insecurity : The Myth Of American Omnipotence (2004) by Carol Brightman, p. 182
  • Only those are fit to live who are not afraid of dying.
    • Richards Topical Encyclopedia (1951)
  • «Duty, Honor, Country» — those three hallowed words reverently dictate what you ought to be, what you can be, what you will be. They are your rallying point to build courage when courage seems to fail, to regain faith when there seems to be little cause for faith, to create hope when hope becomes forlorn… In my dreams I hear again the crash of guns, the rattle of musketry, the strange, mournful mutter of the battlefield. But in the evening of my memory always I come back to West Point. Always there echoes and re-echoes: Duty, Honor, Country. Today marks my final roll call with you. But I want you to know that when I cross the river, my last conscious thoughts will be of the Corps, and the Corps, and the Corps. I bid you farewell.
    • Sylvanus Thayer Award acceptance speech to the cadets of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York (12 May 1962)
  • Rules are mostly made to be broken and are too often for the lazy to hide behind.
    • Reported in William A. Ganoe, MacArthur Close-Up (1962), p. 137
  • Could I have but a line a century hence crediting a contribution to the advance of peace, I would gladly yield every honor which has been accorded me in war.
    • Macarthur and the American Century: A Reader (2001) edited by William M Leary
  • The Puerto Ricans forming the ranks of the gallant 65th Infantry on the battlefields of Korea … are writing a brilliant record of achievement in battle and I am proud indeed to have them in this command. I wish that we might have many more like them.
    • Quoted on 12 February 1951 in Tokyo
  • Our swollen budgets constantly have been misrepresented to the public. Our government has kept us in a perpetual state of fear — kept us in a continuous stampede of patriotic fervor — with the cry of grave national emergency. Always there has been some terrible evil at home or some monstrous foreign power that was going to gobble us up if we did not blindly rally behind it by furnishing the exorbitant funds demanded. Yet, in retrospect, these disasters seem never to have happened, seem never to have been quite real.
    • Address to the Annual Stockholders Sperry Rand Corporation (30 July 1957), as published in General MacArthur Speeches and Reports 1908-1964 (2000) by Edward T. Imparato, p. 206

1920s[edit]

  • Americans never quit.
    • Comment as president of the American Olympic committee when the manager of the American boxing team in the 1928 Olympic games wanted to withdraw the team because of what he thought was an unfair decision against an American boxer; reported in The New York Times (August 9, 1928), p. 13.

1940s[edit]

  • The history of failure in war can almost be summed up in two words: ‘Too late.’ Too late in comprehending the deadly purpose of a potential enemy; too late in realizing the mortal danger; too late in preparedness; too late in uniting all possible forces for resistance, too late in standing with one’s friends. Victory in war results from no mysterious alchemy or wizardry but depends entirely upon the concentration of superior force at the critical points of combat.
    • Statement MacArthur made in 1940, as quoted by James B. Reston in Prelude to Victory (1942), p. 64
  • The soldier, be he friend or foe, is charged with the protection of the weak and unarmed. It is the very essence and reason for his being. When he violates this sacred trust, he not only profanes his entire cult but threatens the very fabric of international society. The traditions of fighting men are long and honorable. They are based upon the noblest of human traits—sacrifice.
    • From a 1946 statement by MacArthur confirming the death sentence imposed by a U. S. military commission on Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita, as quoted in MacArthur’s Reminscences (McGraw-Hill, 1964) p. 295. Also used as the epigraph to Telford Taylor’s Nuremberg and Vietnam: An American Tragedy (New York: Bantam, 1970).
  • We must not inadvertently slip into the same condition internally as the one which we fight externally. Like Abraham Lincoln, I am a firm believer in the people and, if given the truth, they can be depended on to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring before them the real facts.
    • As quoted in The Tuscaloosa News, April 14, 1944, p. 3
    • A slightly differently worded quote is also apparently cited in The Riddle of MacArthur, by John Gunther, New York: Harper, 1950, p. 61. See Wikiquote: Abraham Lincoln: Misattributed quotes

Victory broadcast (1945)[edit]

Radio broadcast after the surrender of the Japan on the battleship USS Missouri officially ending World War II (2 September 1945)
  • Today the guns are silent. A great tragedy has ended. A great victory has been won. The skies no longer rain with death — the seas bear only commerce — men everywhere walk upright in the sunlight. The entire world lies quietly at peace. The holy mission has been completed. And in reporting this to you, the people, I speak for the thousands of silent lips, forever stilled among the jungles and the beaches and in the deep waters of the Pacific which marked the way.
  • We have known the bitterness of defeat and the exultation of triumph, and from both we have learned there can be no turning back. We must go forward to preserve in peace what we won in war.
    A new era is upon us. Even the lesson of victory itself brings with it profound concern, both for our future security and the survival of civilization. The destructiveness of the war potential, through progressive advances in scientific discovery, has in fact now reached a point which revises the traditional concepts of war.
  • Men since the beginning of time have sought peace. Various methods through the ages have been attempted to devise an international process to prevent or settle disputes between nations. From the very start workable methods were found in so far as individual citizens were concerned, but the mechanics of an instrumentality of larger international scope have never been successful. Military alliances, balances of power, Leagues of Nations, all in turn failed, leaving the only path to be by way of the crucible of war. The utter destructiveness of war now blocks out this alternative. We have had our last chance. If we will not devise some greater and more equitable system, Armageddon will be at our door.
  • We stand in Tokyo today reminiscent of our countryman, Commodore Perry, ninety-two years ago. His purpose was to bring to Japan an era of enlightenment and progress, by lifting the veil of isolation to the friendship, trade, and commerce of the world. But alas the knowledge thereby gained of western science was forged into an instrument of oppression and human enslavement. Freedom of expression, freedom of action, even freedom of thought were denied through appeal to superstition, and through the application of force. We are committed by the Potsdam Declaration of principles to see that the Japanese people are liberated from this condition of slavery. … To the Pacific basin has come the vista of a new emancipated world. Today, freedom is on the offensive, democracy is on the march. Today, in Asia as well as in Europe, unshackled peoples are tasting the full sweetness of liberty, the relief from fear.
  • Let us pray that peace be now restored to the world and that God will preserve it always

1950s[edit]

Farewell address to Congress (1951)[edit]

Farewell address to a Joint Session of Congress (19 April 1951) (with MPEG audio)
  • I stand on this rostrum with a sense of deep humility and great pride — humility in the weight of those great American architects of our history who have stood here before me; pride in the reflection that this home of legislative debate represents human liberty in the purest form yet devised.
  • Here are centered the hopes and aspirations and faith of the entire human race. I do not stand here as advocate for any partisan cause, for the issues are fundamental and reach quite beyond the realm of partisan consideration. They must be resolved on the highest plane of national interest if our course is to prove sound and our future protected. I trust, therefore, that you will do me the justice of receiving that which I have to say as solely expressing the considered viewpoint of a fellow American.
  • I address you with neither rancor nor bitterness in the fading twilight of life, with but one purpose in mind: to serve my country. The issues are global and so interlocked that to consider the problems of one sector, oblivious to those of another, is but to court disaster for the whole. While Asia is commonly referred to as the Gateway to Europe, it is no less true that Europe is the Gateway to Asia, and the broad influence of the one cannot fail to have its impact upon the other.
  • In this situation, it becomes vital that our own country orient its policies in consonance with this basic evolutionary condition rather than pursue a course blind to the reality that the colonial era is now past and the Asian peoples covet the right to shape their own free destiny. What they seek now is friendly guidance, understanding, and support — not imperious direction — the dignity of equality and not the shame of subjugation.
  • The Pacific no longer represents menacing avenues of approach for a prospective invader. It assumes, instead, the friendly aspect of a peaceful lake. Our line of defense is a natural one and can be maintained with a minimum of military effort and expense.
  • China, up to 50 years ago, was completely non-homogenous, being compartmented into groups divided against each other. The war-making tendency was almost non-existent, as they still followed the tenets of the Confucian ideal of pacifist culture. At the turn of the century, under the regime of Chang Tso Lin, efforts toward greater homogeneity produced the start of a nationalist urge. This was further and more successfully developed under the leadership of Chiang Kai-Shek, but has been brought to its greatest fruition under the present regime to the point that it has now taken on the character of a united nationalism of increasingly dominant, aggressive tendencies.
  • The Japanese people, since the war, have undergone the greatest reformation recorded in modern history. With a commendable will, eagerness to learn, and marked capacity to understand, they have, from the ashes left in war’s wake, erected in Japan an edifice dedicated to the supremacy of individual liberty and personal dignity; and in the ensuing process there has been created a truly representative government committed to the advance of political morality, freedom of economic enterprise, and social justice. Politically, economically, and socially Japan is now abreast of many free nations of the earth and will not again fail the universal trust… I sent all four of our occupation divisions to the Korean battlefront without the slightest qualms as to the effect of the resulting power vacuum upon Japan. The results fully justified my faith. I know of no nation more serene, orderly, and industrious, nor in which higher hopes can be entertained for future constructive service in the advance of the human race.
  • While I was not consulted prior to the President’s decision to intervene in support of the Republic of Korea, that decision from a military standpoint, proved a sound one, as we hurled back the invader and decimated his forces. Our victory was complete, and our objectives within reach, when Red China intervened with numerically superior ground forces.
  • While no man in his right mind would advocate sending our ground forces into continental China, and such was never given a thought, the new situation did urgently demand a drastic revision of strategic planning if our political aim was to defeat this new enemy as we had defeated the old.
  • We could hold in Korea by constant maneuver and in an approximate area where our supply line advantages were in balance with the supply line disadvantages of the enemy, but we could hope at best for only an indecisive campaign with its terrible and constant attrition upon our forces if the enemy utilized its full military potential. I have constantly called for the new political decisions essential to a solution.
    Efforts have been made to distort my position. It has been said, in effect, that I was a warmonger. Nothing could be further from the truth. I know war as few other men now living know it, and nothing to me is more revolting. I have long advocated its complete abolition, as its very destructiveness on both friend and foe has rendered it useless as a means of settling international disputes. … But once war is forced upon us, there is no other alternative than to apply every available means to bring it to a swift end.
  • War’s very object is victory, not prolonged indecision. In war there is no substitute for victory.
  • There are some who, for varying reasons, would appease Red China. They are blind to history’s clear lesson, for history teaches with unmistakable emphasis that appeasement but begets new and bloodier war. It points to no single instance where this end has justified that means, where appeasement has led to more than a sham peace. Like blackmail, it lays the basis for new and successively greater demands until, as in blackmail, violence becomes the only other alternative.
  • The tragedy of Korea is further heightened by the fact that its military action is confined to its territorial limits. It condemns that nation, which it is our purpose to save, to suffer the devastating impact of full naval and air bombardment while the enemy’s sanctuaries are fully protected from such attack and devastation. Of the nations of the world, Korea alone, up to now, is the sole one which has risked its all against communism. The magnificence of the courage and fortitude of the Korean people defies description.
    They have chosen to risk death rather than slavery. Their last words to me were: «Don’t scuttle the Pacific!»
  • I am closing my 52 years of military service. When I joined the Army, even before the turn of the century, it was the fulfillment of all of my boyish hopes and dreams. The world has turned over many times since I took the oath on the plain at West Point, and the hopes and dreams have long since vanished, but I still remember the refrain of one of the most popular barrack ballads of that day which proclaimed most proudly that «old soldiers never die; they just fade away.»
    And like the old soldier of that ballad, I now close my military career and just fade away, an old soldier who tried to do his duty as God gave him the light to see that duty.
    • Audio clip (ogg format)

Speech to the Texas Legislature[edit]

  • I am concerned for the security of our great Nation; not so much because of any potential threat from without, but because of the insidious forces working from within which, opposed to all of our great traditions, have gravely weakened the structure and tone of our American way of life.
    • Austin, Texas (13 June 1951); as published in General MacArthur Speeches and Reports 1908-1964, ed. Edward T. Imparato, Turner Publishing Company (2000), p.175

1960s[edit]

High honors have come my way, but I shall always believe that my greatest honor was being a West Point graduate. The Military Academy has taught me many things, some of them not within the covers of books or written by any man.
The first of these is tolerance: not to debase or deprive those from whom one may differ by character or custom, by race or color or distinction.
The second is balance: a sense of proportion and ability to put first things first. A realization that there is a time and place for everything, but a recognition of the old maxim «nothing too much»- what the ancients meant by the «golden mean».
The third is intelligence, rather than sentiment or emotion. Sentimentalism has muddled many problems, has settled none. Intellect is a man’s only hope for improvement over his present state.
And last, but by no means least, is courage: moral courage- the courage of one’s convictions- the courage to see a thing through. This is not easy. The world is in constant conspiracy against the brave. It is the age-old struggle of the roar of the crowd on one side and the voice of your conscience on the other.
Tolerance, balance, intelligence, courage. These should be the hallmarks of every graduate of the Military Academy at West Point.

  • From MacArthur’s remarks to a delegation of cadets from the United States Military Academy at West Point on the occasion of MacArthur’s eighty-fourth birthday, on January 26, 1964. Since MacArthur’s retirement from active duty in 1952, West Point had maintained a tradition of sending cadets to visit MacArthur on his birthday each year. Their visit in 1964 was the last. As quoted in A Soldier Speaks: Public Papers and Speeches of General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (1965), edited by Vorin E. Whan, Jr., p. 366-367

Reminiscences (1964)[edit]

  • These reminiscences are neither history, biography nor a diary, although they comprise something of each of these categories. What is presented is far from a complete account even of all of the incidents in which I had a part, but merely my recollections of events, refreshed by a reference to my own memoranda and a free use of staff studies and historical records made under my direction and supervision. It may assist the future historian when he seeks to account for the motives and reasons which influenced some of the actions in the great drama of war. It is also my hope that it will prove of some interest to the rising generations, who may learn thereform that a country and government such as ours is worth fighting for, and dying for, if need be.
    • p. v
  • In preparing this record, penned by my own hand, of my life and my participation in our great struggles for national existence, human liberty and political equality, I make no pretence to literary merit. The motive that induces me is not authorship. The import of the subject matter of my narrative is my only claim to attention. The statements of facts are a matter of documentary evidence. The comments are my own and show how I saw the matters treated of, whether others saw them in the same light or not. Respectfully dedicating this work to the millions of armed men and devoted women who participated in the great wars of this country, I leave it as a heritage to my wife and son.
    • p. vi
  • Late in the war, General Marshall, while returning from an Allied conference between Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill at Tehran, stopped over a day in the Southwest Pacific Area. We had a long and frank discussion. I called attention to the paucity of men and materiel that I was receiving as compared with all other theaters of war. He said he realized the imbalance and regretted it, but could do little to alter the low priority accorded the area. He said:
Admiral King claimed the Pacific as the rightful domain of the Navy; he seemed to regard the operations there as almost his own private war; he apparently felt that the only way to remove the blot on the Navy disaster at Pearl Harbor was to have the Navy command a great victory over Japan; he was adamant in his refusal to allow any major fleet to be under other command than that of naval officers although maintaining that naval officers were competent to command ground or air forces; he resented the prominent part I had in the Pacific War; he was vehement in his personal criticism of me and encouraged Navy propaganda to that end; he had the complete support of President Roosevelt and his Chief of Staff, Admiral Leahy, and in many cases of General Arnold, the head of the Air Force.
  • p. 183
  • The days of the frontal attack are over. Modern infantry weapons are too deadly, and frontal assault is only for mediocre commanders. Good commanders do not turn in heavy losses.
    • p. 198
  • In the last fifteen days of the war, my Fifth and Seventh Air Forces flew 6,732 sorties against Kyushu alone. Thus, with a deafening roar of blasting bombs, Kenney’s Far East air forces culminated their blows against Japan. During the last seven and a half months of the war, their planes destroyed 2,846,932 tons of shipping and 1,375 enemy aircraft, dropped 100,000 tons of bombs, and flew over 150,00 sorties.
    • p. 265
  • The President’s party arrived in three planes with thirty-five reporters and photographers. As I shook hands with Mr. Truman, he remarked, «I’ve been a long time meeting you, General.» I replied, «I hope it won’t be so long next time.» But there was never to be a next time.
    • p. 361
  • I had been warned about Mr. Truman’s quick and violent temper and prejudices, but he radiated nothing but courtesy and good humor during our meeting. He has an engaging personality, a quick and witty tongue, and I liked him from the start. At the conference itself, he seemed to take great pride in his historical knowledge, but, it seemed to me that in spite of his having read much, it was of a superficial character, encompassing facts without the logic and reasoning dictating those facts. Of the Far East he knew little, presenting a strange combination of distorted history and vague hopes that somehow, some way, we could do something to help those struggling against Communism.
    • p. 361
  • The object and practice of liberty lies in the limitation of governmental power. Through the ages the constantly expanding grasp of government has been liberty’s greatest threat.
    • p. 417
  • There are many who have lost faith in this early American ideal and believe in a form of socialistic, totalitarian rule, a sort of big brother deity to run our lives for us. They no longer believe that free men can successfully manage their own affairs. Their thesis is that a handful of men, centered in government, largely bureaucratic not elected, can utilize the proceeds of our toil and labor to greater advantage than those who create it. Nowhere in the history of the human race is there justification for this reckless faith in political power. It is the oldest, most reactionary of all forms of social organization. It was tried out in ancient Babylon, ancient Greece and ancient Rome; in Mussolini’s Italy, in Hitler’s Germany, and in all communist countries. Wherever and whenever it has been attempted, it has failed utterly to provide economic security, and has generally ended in national disaster. It embraces an essential idiocy, that individuals who, as private citizens, are not to manage the disposition of their own earnings, become in public office supermen who can manage the affairs of the world.
    • p. 418
  • As I was leaving the hotel this morning, a doorman asked me, «Where are you headed, General?» and when I replied, «West Point,» he remarked, «Beautiful place. Have you ever been there before?»
    • p. 423

Quotes about MacArthur[edit]

The best and the worst things you hear about him are both true. ~ Sir Thomas Blamey
Alphabetized by author

What’s the difference between Douglas MacArthur and God? God doesn’t think he’s Douglas MacArthur. ~ Anonymous
The man was clearly fallible, but the legend was not. In the dark days of early 1942, when rallying cries and heroes were in short supply, the legend had to be preserved at all costs. FDR knew it. Leahy appears to have blindly affirmed it. King, Nimitz and Halsey would all come to grips with it in their own ways. But for now, America desperately needed a hero, and Douglas MacArthur was the man of the hour. ~ Walter R. Borneman
The general American public, still stunned by the shock of Pearl Harbor and uncertain what lay ahead in Europe, desperately needed a hero, they wholeheartedly embraced Douglas MacArthur … There simply were no other choices that came close to matching his mystique, not to mention his evocative lone-wolf stand—something that has always resonated with Americans. ~ Walter R. Borneman
MacArthur’s dismissal was not exactly unexpected in view of his feud with the Joint Chiefs of Staff. However, like most other officers in the Army, I was shocked at the abrupt termination of such a distinguished career. ~ Mark W. Clark
Arthur MacArthur was the most flamboyantly egotistical man I had ever seen, until I met his son. ~ Enoch Crowder
Spent the entire day preparing drafts of president’s messages to MacArthur and Quezon. Long, difficult, and irritating. Both are babies. ~ Dwight D. Eisenhower
In this man is the uncompromising will to win, and the character and integrity to lead his country to victory on the battlefields of the world. The respect of the world is his. Men and nations know that when others may fail they can always turn to him for leadership and victory. ~ Frazier Hunt
General, I have a lot riding on you. I hope you don’t pull a MacArthur on me. ~ Lyndon B. Johnson
He was a superb leader and was probably the greatest general this country has ever produced. ~ George S. Patton, IV
Certainly no graduate has left greater evidence of deep affection for West Point and the Corps than MacArthur, but the cadets saw little of this during his superintendency. ~ Maxwell D. Taylor
I fired him because he wouldn’t respect the authority of the president. That’s the answer to that. I didn’t fire him because he was a dumb son of a bitch, although he was, but that’s not against the law for generals. If it was, half to three-quarters of them would be in jail. ~ Harry S. Truman
It was Harry S. Truman who had a policy. General MacArthur was nothing more than a collection of disorganized ideas. ~ Margaret Truman
  • Dugout Doug MacArthur lies ashaking on the Rock
    Safe from all the bombers and from any sudden shock
    Dugout Doug is eating of the best food on Bataan
    And his troops go starving on.
    • Anonymous, excerpt from «Dugout Dug», a derogatory poem about MacArthur that circulated during the siege of the Bataan peninsula in the Philippines in 1942. The words were at some point matched with the melody of «Battle Hymn of the Republic,» but who originally wrote them is unknown.
  • What’s the difference between Douglas MacArthur and God? God doesn’t think he’s Douglas MacArthur.
    • Anonymous, popular World War II-era joke told about MacArthur regarding his notorious ego.
  • Leahy had no part in the decision to relieve MacArthur, which came as a considerable shock to him, for he had known and liked the brilliant general for over fifty years, even though he had deplored his theatrical ways. He never questioned the president’s authority and he felt he was not sufficiently informed to make a judgment on the question of MacArthur’s relief. He wrote, somewhat mildly that the «detachment of MacArthur will stimulate aggressive political opposition by the Republican member of Congress.»
    • Henry H. Adams, Witness to Power: The Life of Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy (1985), p.
  • The best and the worst things you hear about him are both true.
    • Sir Thomas Blamey, the only Australian Army officer ever to rise to the rank of field marshal, as quoted in Blamey, Controversial Soldier: a Biography of Field Marshal Sir Thomas Blamey (1973) by John Hetherington, p. 223
  • On a raw November day in 1863, the Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin formed beneath Missionary Ridge outside Chattanooga, Tennessee. Union troops were trying to lift the siege of the town, but Confederate defenders were proving stubborn. Quite suddenly, without orders, Union regiments in the center of the line began to move up the ridge. When their wild advance was over, among the battle flags atop the crest was the standard of the Twenty-Fourth Wisconsin, carried there by its eighteen-year-old «boy colonel,» Arthur MacArthur, whose son, Douglas, would spend most of his own military career trying to emulate his father’s charge.
    • Walter R. Borneman, The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy and King — The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea (2012), p. 13
  • Popular perception has long suggested that FDR favored the Navy over the Army, but when it came to budgets, deployments, and promotions, he was evenhanded as a commander in chief. On an emotional level, however, Roosevelt’s combination inspection-fishing-vacation trips — such as he enjoyed aboard the cruiser Houston — were among his favorite occasions. And his long-standing relationships with the Navy’s admirals, particularly the duty-minded Leahy, made him more comfortable having them around. This contrast is underscored by remembering that the Army Chief of Staff from 1930 to 1935 was Douglas MacArthur. The general was still trying to emulate his father’s advance up to Missionary Ridge during the Civil War, and his visits to the White House often took on the aura of a state visit. FDR was not intimidated by MacArthur — or anyone else — but neither was he terribly comfortable with him. When MacArthur left Washington for the Philippines and Malin Craig, whom Roosevelt did not know well, became Army Chief of Staff, it was only natural that Roosevelt gravitated toward the loyal and understated Leahy as his chief military adviser.
    • Walter R. Borneman, The Admirals (2012), p. 167
  • Nine hours later, after other Japanese air attacks against northern Luzon were reported, several hundred Mitsubishi bombers and Zero fighters roared over Clark Field outside Manila and destroyed the bulk of American airpower in the Philippines — MacArthur’s air force — as it sat on the ground. Even after years of increasingly hostile Japanese intentions and fair evidence that something was building to a head in the Far East, some might be tempted to forgive MacArthur for being the victim of a surprise attack. But how could he still have his airplanes lined up wingtip to wingtip nine hours after being notified of the attack on Pearl Harbor? Two days later, with the Philippine skies largely void of defending planes, another Japanese air attack destroyed the American naval base at Cavite. MacArthur «might have made a better showing at the beaches and passes, and certainly he should have saved his planes on December 8,» a newly appointed brigadier general who had long served as the general’s aide confided to his diary. «But,» wrote Dwight D. Eisenhower, «he’s still the hero.» The man was clearly fallible, but the legend was not. In the dark days of early 1942, when rallying cries and heroes were in short supply, the legend had to be preserved at all costs. FDR knew it. Leahy appears to have blindly affirmed it. King, Nimitz and Halsey would all come to grips with it in their own ways. But for now, America desperately needed a hero, and Douglas MacArthur was the man of the hour.
    • Walter R. Borneman, The Admirals (2012), p. 227
  • Douglas MacArthur never acknowledged the basic tenet of American constitutional government: that the military is subordinate to civilian control. He moved quite easily between civil and military worlds because he saw himself at the apex of both. Indeed, Douglas MacArthur fought many military and political battles over the course of his career- winning some, losing others- but his greatest loss came in a campaign he waged his entire life: the one against himself. He was brilliant, charismatic, and decisive, but he was also manipulative, deceitful, and as egocentric as any military leader in American history- the «George trio» of George McClellan, George Armstrong Custer, and George S. Patton being his only close competition.
    • Walter R. Borneman, MacArthur at War: World War II in the Pacific’ (2016), p. 506-507
  • Ironically, during four years of war, MacArthur may have owed the most to the very people he was certain were out to discredit and disparage him. While never among his fans, Franklin Roosevelt and George Marshall nonetheless consistently supported MacArthur within the framework of their global priorities, from the first efforts to resupply the Philippines to MacArthur’s appointment as Allied supreme commander. Even then, where would MacArthur’s Southwest Pacific Area have been had not Ernie King urged the Joint Chiefs to pour resources into the Pacific and wage a two-front war?
    • Walter R. Borneman, MacArthur at War (2016), p. 507
  • On September 2, 1945, after four years of war, one thing was certain about Douglas MacArthur and his place in history. His rhetoric, however hyperbolic at times, and his characterization of events, however embellished his facts, had served to generate an enormous rallying cry for the American people in the dark days of 1942. Responsible though he was for much of the debacle in the Philippines, he had miraculously escaped on presidential orders, and the great majority in the Allied world was left with no doubt that he would return. He was their inspiration, their hope, and their synonym for victory over Japan. They saw only his stage-managed resolve, not the man behind the curtain.
    • Walter R. Borneman, MacArthur at War (2016), p. 507
  • MacArthur carried with him an indomitable will to win. It was ingrained in his genes. It was his most laudable quality. There is, as he would say, no substitute for victory, a concept that was much clearer in World War II than it would become even five short years later in Korea. He fit the times perfectly. Douglas MacArthur’s most important contribution to history was to be the hero who rallied America and its allies when they were at a low ebb and to become the symbol of determined resolve so desperately needed in the grim months of 1942. It was the role of a lifetime and, publicly, he played it brilliantly. That he came to believe more strongly through this experience in his perception of himself, and through this adulation judged it to be unequivocal, is to his discredit.
    • Walter R. Borneman, MacArthur at War (2016), p. 508
  • George Marshall may well have sighed at the results of the March 1945 poll- not at his own place but at MacArthur’s. Marshall, more than most, knew the whole story of MacArthur’s war. It is a mark of Marshall’s own greatness that he so deftly managed MacArthur’s fiery comet and unselfishly used its brilliance to accomplish the objectives of a global war.
    • Walter R. Borneman, MacArthur at War (2016), p. 508
  • Douglas MacArthur has been dead for over fifty years yet he remains one of the most controversial military figures of the twentieth century. His well-polished reputation was far from unanimously accepted among his contemporaries, and a half-century has done nothing to smooth the contradictions of his personality and his career. There remains no middle ground with Douglas MacArthur.
    • Walter R. Borneman, «Why Did MacArthur Become a Hero? In a Crisis We Are Desperate for Leaders.», History News Network of the Columbia College of Arts & Sciences at George Washington University (5 May 2016)
  • Most importantly, in a fragile period of the American psyche when the general American public, still stunned by the shock of Pearl Harbor and uncertain what lay ahead in Europe, desperately needed a hero, they wholeheartedly embraced Douglas MacArthur—good press copy that he was. There simply were no other choices that came close to matching his mystique, not to mention his evocative lone-wolf stand—something that has always resonated with Americans.
    • Walter R. Borneman, «Why Did MacArthur Become a Hero? In a Crisis We Are Desperate for Leaders.», History News Network of the Columbia College of Arts & Sciences at George Washington University (5 May 2016)
  • So Weinberger reported to MacArthur’s headquarters in Brisbane, where he was a very junior officer on the staff of the legendary general. Nonetheless, he saw enough to have a full appreciation of MacArthur’s brilliance. «I saw the plans for the invasion of Japan,» Weinberger says. «The breadth and scope of MacArthur’s brilliance. With very few troops, a couple of understrength divisions, and some Australian militia forces, he accomplished an enormous amount in the Pacific.» The young intelligence officer also learned directly from MacArthur about judgment and decision making. Weinberger was on duty one night as American forces were moving on a small island, lightly occupied by the Japanese, to take it for a radio base. Suddenly, there were reports of a Japanese ship and Japanese aircraft in the vicinity. Weinberger thought he’d better take this information directly to MacArthur. «So I walked two blocks to his hotel,» Weinberger remembers. «I got through the various security and gave him the message He came out in his bathrobe, looking just as erect and imposing as he did in full uniform, that magnificent posture, deep voice. He looked the message over carefully and said, ‘Well, Lieutenant, what do you think?’ I said, ‘General, I think it’s a coincidence that they’re there. They don’t seem to have hostile intent. I would go ahead with the landing.’ General MacArthur said, ‘That’s what I think, too. Good night.'» Weinberger walked back through the night to his post «in fear and trembling — to see if I was wrong or not. Fortunately, it worked out.»
    • Tom Brokaw, describing experiences of Caspar Weinberger, 15th U.S. Secretary of Defense, while he was an Army intelligence officer and a member of MacArthur’s staff during World War II, in The Greatest Generation (1998), p. 360
  • By the time of the surrender of Corregidor on May 6, MacArthur and his family had escaped to Australia under direct orders from President Roosevelt. (They left Corregidor in the PT boat of Lieutenant John Bulkely, who received the Medal of Honor for his many daring missions in the Philippines in the months from December 8, 1941 to April 10, 1942.) In ordering MacArthur to leave his command, President Roosevelt and General George C. Marshall, his Army Chief of Staff, made a political calculation. They reasoned that an inspirational figure planning a return to his command from Australia was a much more potent force than a dead hero in the Philippines. In Australia General MacArthur was presented with the Medal of Honor. MacArthur had been personally courageous in the face of the bombing attacks on Corregidor, but he did not get the medal for any single specified act of bravery. His award is one of the few of the war that could be described as «symbolic,» in large part because MacArthur’s Philippine army was an inspiration to the American people during those dark days. MacArthur himself acknowledged this when he accepted the medal, saying that he felt it was «intended not so much for me personally as it is a recognition of the indomitable courage of the gallant army which it has been my honor to command.» (MacArthur’s medal came seventy-eight years after his father, Arthur, earned a Medal of Honor for rallying Northern troops on November 25, 1863, at Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, during the Civil War. Together the MacArthurs are the only father and son both to receive the Medal of Honor.)
    • Above and Beyond: A History of the Medal of Honor From the Civil War to Vietnam (1985), by the editors of the Boston Publishing Company, p. 200
  • Stepping off in Tokyo, I renewed an old acquaintance with General Douglas MacArthur, then Supreme Commander of the UN Forces. Ours really was an old acquaintanceship dating back to 1910, when my father, Charles C. Clark, then a major of infantry, was attending the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. MacArthur, then a first lieutenant of engineers, used to visit our house regularly, but at the time of the meeting in Tokyo I hadn’t seen him for forty years. As we shook hands, MacArthur asked, «How’s your mother? Give her my love; I’m a great admirer of hers.» I knew that the general’s courtly inquiry would please my mother, who has had her husband or son in every big shoot from the Spanish-American War to Korea.
    • Mark W. Clark, From The Danube to the Yalu (1954), p. 25-26
  • MacArthur could not understand why we had permitted the enemy, the Chinese Communists, to have the advantage of a sanctuary as their base of supply and air operations. He expressed the strong conviction that had we carried the war to the Chinese with air attacks across the Yalu River, or even with the threat of such attacks, the war in Korea would have taken a course far more favorable to the United states and the United Nations. When the Chinese came into the war, masquerading their best armies as «volunteers,» we should have hit them hard, MacArthur said. He said he couldn’t conceive that our government would fail to retaliate when a nation came to war against us and crossed over the border into the country in which our troops were in battle. MacArthur was particularly bitter that his government had failed to do everything in its power to protect the American and Allied troops under his command when those men were menaced by the Chinese armies that were hurled into the Korean War. I fully agreed with MacArthur that we should not have allowed the enemy a sanctuary north of the Yalu. I have never changed my opinion.
    • Mark W. Clark, From the Danube to the Yalu (1954), p. 26-27
  • It was only two months later that President Truman relieved MacArthur of his command. I was at a camp in the Southern states on a field-training inspection tour at the time. Someone told me the news as I came out of my billet early in the morning. My first thought was, «I wonder if I’m going to get the job.» The answer was yes — but not until about a year later. MacArthur’s dismissal was not exactly unexpected in view of his feud with the Joint Chiefs of Staff. However, like most other officers in the Army, I was shocked at the abrupt termination of such a distinguished career.
    • Mark W. Clark, From the Danube to the Yalu (1954), p. 27
  • Arthur MacArthur’s importance as a military leader grew as time went on. He became military governor of the Philippines in 1900. As a lieutenant general he served as Assistant Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army in 1906. He retired in 1909. His famous son, Douglas MacArthur, was also a Medal of Honor winner. He became the symbol of American determination to return to the Philippines after their seizure by Japanese forces in World War II. Thus, both father and son were famous generals, both served in the Philippines, and both were awarded the coveted Medal of Honor.
    • Donald E. Cooke, For Conspicuous Gallantry: Winners of the Medal of Honor (1966), p. 87
  • Arthur MacArthur was the most flamboyantly egotistical man I had ever seen, until I met his son.
    • Enoch Crowder, aide to Arthur MacArthur, Jr. during the Philippines campaign in 1899, as quoted in American Caesar by William Manchester, p. 30
  • During the war Westerners were told of the «child mind of the Jap conscript.» After the war, the same newspapers and magazines spoke of «Seventy Million Problem Children»; and cartoonists had a field day depicting the Japanese as infants in the crib or, more often, children attending General MacArthur’s School of Democracy. Such paternalism was unquestionably the essence of MacArthur’s attitude toward the Japanese- and Oriental people in general. His guiding philosophy during the occupation, he stated widely in publicized Senate hearings in 1951, after President Truman had recalled him from Asia, had been to treat the Japanese as twelve-year-olds. This was not an incautious remark, for the former supreme commander went on to expound his position at some length, explaining in the process why he believed the Japanese might be more receptive to American-style democratic ideas than the «mature» Germans. «The German problem is a completely and entirely different one from the Japanese problem,» MacArthur informed the senators. «The German people were a mature race. If the Anglo-Saxon was say 45 years of age in his development, in the sciences, the arts, divinity, culture, the Germans were quite as mature. The Japanese, however, in spite of their their antiquity measured by time, were in a very tuitionary condition. Measured by the standards of modern civization, they would be like a boy of 12 as compared with our development of 45 years. Like any tuitionary period, they were susceptible to following new models, new ideas. You can implant basic concepts there. They were still close enough to origin to be elastic and acceptable to new concepts…»
    • John W. Dower, War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War (1986), p. 303-304
  • In his distinctive way, MacArthur meant this as a compliment of sorts, in that he was attempting to convey why he believed democracy might take firmer root in postwar Japan than in Germany. The bluntness of the metaphor embarrassed the general’s Japanese admirers, however, and- in one of history’s smaller losses- prompted some of them to abandon plans for a Statue of Liberty-sized statue of the general in Tokyo Bay. The comment was not only a fair reflection of the supreme commander’s outlook, however, but also helps illuminate the kind but frequently condescending premises of U.S. occupation policy in general. Such parent-child or teacher-student paternalism was reminiscent of Japan’s own now discredited Co-Prosperity Sphere rhetoric, and had obvious roots in the Western colonial tradition exemplified by such phrases as «white man’s burden» and «little brown brother». It was certainly not an attitude reserved for the Japanese alone, although MacArthur’s imposing paternal presence made it especially conspicuous in the Japanese case.
    • John W. Dower, War Without Mercy: Race & Power in the Pacific War (1986), p. 304
  • Another long message on «strategy» to MacArthur. He sent in one extolling the virtues of the flank offensive. Wonder what he thinks we’ve been studying for all these years. His lecture would be good for plebes.
    • Dwight D. Eisenhower in a diary entry on February 8, 1942, as quoted in The Eisenhower Diaries (1981), edited by Robert H. Farrell, p. 47. «Plebes» refers to new cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point, the military college that Eisenhower and MacArthur both graduated from.
  • Spent the entire day preparing drafts of president’s messages to MacArthur and Quezon. Long, difficult, and irritating. Both are babies.
    • Dwight D. Eisenhower in a diary entry on February 9, 1942, as quoted in The Eisenhower Diaries (1981), edited by Robert H. Farrell, p. 47
  • Message to MacArthur was approved by President and dispatched. I’m dubious about the thing. I cannot help believing that we are disturbed by editorials and reacting to «public opinion» rather than to military logic. «Pa» Watson is certain we must get MacArthur out, as being worth «five army corps.» He is doing a good job where he is, but I’m doubtful that he’d do so well in more complicated situations. Bataan is made to order for him. It’s in the public eye; it as made him a public hero; it has all the essentials of drama; and he is acknowledged king on the spot. If brought out, public opinion will force him into a position where his love of the limelight may ruin him.
    • Dwight D. Eisenhower, on February 23, 1942, The Eisenhower Diaries (1981), edited by Robert H. Farrell, p. 49
  • Corregidor surrendered last night. Poor Wainwright! He did the fighting… [MacArthur] got such glory as the public could find… MacArthur’s tirades, to which TJ and I so often listened to in Manila, would now sound as silly to the public as they then did to us. But he’s a hero! Yah.
    • Dwight D. Eisenhower, The Eisenhower Diaries (1981), edited by Robert H. Farrell, p. 54. «TJ» refers to T.J. Davis, one of MacArthur’s aides at the time.
  • Another Decoration Day finds us still adding to the number of graves that will be decorated in future years. Men are stupid. MacArthur seems to have retired into the Waldorf Towers, from which stronghold he issues statements and occasionally emerges to see a baseball game. The first he does through Whitney — who, I think, is one of the Old Chief’s mistakes. I cannot much blame MacA.— I get the impression that he is in a state of «watchful waiting.» For what, I wouldn’t know, but I do know that in his position I’d be after the bass of Wisconsin, the trout of Wyoming, or vacationing on the beach. Recently I wrote to him — had a nice reply. While I’m determined to stay aloof from all the current snarling and fighting in the United States, I’m most of all determined never to get into the «personality» kind of argument. In that respect the military men (especially including MacA.) have been exemplary.
    • Dwight D. Eisenhower, The Eisenhower Diaries (1981), edited by Robert H. Farrell, p. 193
  • General Douglas MacArthur, a 1903 graduate of the Military Academy and former superintendent, was convinced that athletic programs were a key component in cadet development because commissioned officers must rely on teamwork and prompt decision-making on the battlefield. His famous quote, «Upon the fields of friendly strife are sown the seeds that, on other days, will bear the fruits of victory» was prominently displayed at the entrance to Arvin Gymnasium. As superintendent, he directed that all cadets participate in competitive athletics.
    • Robert F. Foley, Standing Tall: Leadership Lessons in the Life of a Soldier (2022), Philadelphia: Casemate, hardcover, p. 126
  • While at the preparatory school for the Military Academy, I noticed a poster in the supply room that read «Stairway to the Stars.» On the first riser was «West Point,» on the next «Second Lieutenant,» and so forth until, near the top, five stars blazed like a royal diadem. The year was 1953, and some wag had inked in «President» over the stars, obviously referring to Eisenhower. Not to be outdone, another wag added «God» above that, apparently referring to MacArthur. I still laugh at this because there is a grain of truth to most philosophical humor. MacArthur was not immortal, but he was one of those rare military figures that will be remembered and written about for millennia.
    • George M. Hall, The Fifth Star: High Command in an Era of Global War (1994), p. xii
  • The one who came closest to Admiral King in his basic view that the Japanese should be kept under constant pressure was not a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff but the Supreme Commander, Southwest Pacific Area, General MacArthur. Although his role was to recommend and then accept a decision from the JCS, and many of his views on strategy differed sharply from those endorsed by the JCS, his repeated efforts to get more support for his area of command and to push ahead as rapidly and with as much force as possible helped to insure that the war against Japan did not become a forgotten war and were largely responsible for the development of the advance on two axes.
    • Grace Person Hayes, The History of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in World War II: The War Against Japan (1982), p. 725-726
  • In this man is the uncompromising will to win, and the character and integrity to lead his country to victory on the battlefields of the world. The respect of the world is his. Men and nations know that when others may fail they can always turn to him for leadership and victory.
    • Frazier Hunt, MacArthur and the War Against Japan (1944), New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, hardcover, p. 176
  • During the Korean War, MacArthur was a law unto himself, in matters both big and small. He quarreled defiantly in public with President Truman, agitating for nuclear war. In their eventual confrontation on Wake Island, MacArthur went so far as to arrive first and then order the president’s approaching plane into a holding pattern. MacArthur’s commander in chief would thus arrive on the landing strip appearing to be MacArthur’s supplicant. In explaining why he subsequently relieved MacArthur of his command, Truman said, «I fired him because he wouldn’t respect the authority of the president. I didn’t fire him because he was a dumb son of a bitch, although he was, but that’s not against the law for generals.» Truman was arguably pulling his punches. He could have easily called MacArthur an asshole.
    • Aaron James, in his book Assholes: A Theory (2012), p. 1-2
  • General, I have a lot riding on you. I hope you don’t pull a MacArthur on me.
    • Lyndon Johnson, said to Westmoreland when the two men met in Honolulu in 1966. As quoted in The Truman-MacArthur Tug of War – A Lingering Aftermath (1993) by Stephen A. Danner, p. 14-15
  • MacArthur was a flamboyant character who made sure the people back home knew what he was doing to win the war. He was a great publicist but he made many enemies. Generals Marshall and Eisenhower disliked him and even President Roosevelt, resentful of his popularity, did not wish him to have the limelight. After the war he ruled Japan as an all-powerful potentate but he overstepped the mark in Korea which led to his downfall.
    • John Keegan (editor), Who’s Who in World War II (1995), p. 101
  • The spectacle of the United States Army routing unarmed citizens with tanks and firebrands outraged many Americans. The Bonus Army episode came to symbolize Hoover’s supposed insensitivity to the plight of the unemployed. In fact the worst violence, resulting in two deaths, had come at the hands of the district police, not the federal troops, and the blame for the torching of Anacostia Flats was MacArthur’s, not Hoover’s. But Hoover chose to ignore MacArthur’s insubordination and assumed full responsibility for the army’s actions.
    • David M. Kennedy, Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945 (1999), p. 92
  • For a time they had worked closely and harmoniously together, and as a writer Eisenhower may even have been at least a co-inventor of the florid MacArthurian prose style. «You know that General MacArthur got quite a reputation as a silver-tongued speaker when he was in the Philippines,» Eisenhower wrote to a friend. «Who do you think wrote his speeches? I did.» MacArthur was Eisenhower’s first exposure to a senior officer who chose not to draw a clear-cut distinction between the military and the political in Washington’s commingling of the two, who had a wide acquaintance with people in every branch of government. «Working with him brought an additional dimension to my experience,» said Eisenhower. MacArthur was aware that Eisenhower had been directing the War Department efforts to reinforce him but ignored this, and his reaction to Eisenhower’s progress toward eminence in Europe was a mixture of envy and something close to paranoia. MacArthur told his British liaison officer, Gerald Wilkinson, that Eisenhower had not been «wholly loyal» and that for this reason MacArthur had not kept him on in the Philippines when his term was up. (Eisenhower says the opposite: that he requested to be let go and that MacArthur tried to persuade him to stay on; given the choice, belief inclines toward Eisenhower.) MacArthur told Wilkinson that he thought Eisenhower, «spotting White House jealousy of himself (MacA) has enhanced his own position by feeding the White House with anti-MacA data- a delusion on MacArthur’s part, to say the least.
    • Eric Larrabee, Commander in Chief: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, His Lieutenants, and Their War (1987), p. 417-418
  • MacArthur described Eisenhower to Wilkinson as «the ablest officer he has ever known at absorbing 30 minutes detailed description of an idea (or plan or strategic conception?) and getting the whole thing out on paper- orders, arrangements etc etc- in 10 minutes.» According to Wilkinson’s journal, MacArthur said that Eisenhower was «ambitious, clever, hard-working (an excellent bridge player)… a brilliant executive of someone else’s thought but not— as far as MacA knows- in any way an original mind- and no fighting experience…. Eisenhower in turn had no illusions about MacArthur but acknowledged the power of the man’s personality and his capacity for leadership. When Eisenhower took command in the European theater, an off-the-record dinner was arranged for him in London to meet a group of American correspondents, who quizzed him about MacArthur. Eisenhower described the now-familiar characteristics- the ego, the love of the limelight, the self-dramatization, the unstable temperament- and then added: «Yet, if that door opened at this moment, and General MacArthur was standing there, and he said ‘Ike, follow me,’ I’d get up and follow him.» Of Eisenhower’s respect for Marshall there can be no doubt; he told Beetle Smith that he wouldn’t trade Marshall for fifty MacArthurs. («My God,» the thought came to him, «that would be a lousy deal. What would I do with fifty MacArthurs?»)
    • Eric Larrabee, Commander in Chief: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, His Lieutenants, and Their War (1987), p. 417-418
  • It was disturbing to see that General Westmoreland kept asking for additional troops without any clear objective. During the Korean War, Douglas MacArthur requested permission to cross the Yalu River to invade Manchuria. He was fired. General Westmoreland kept asking for new troops and didn’t know what to do with them. He was later promoted to Army Chief of Staff. This was the sign of the times. It was unfortunate that we did not have generals in Viet Nam of MacArthur’s caliber who knew what the objectives were and how to achieve them.
    • Lam Quang Thi, The Twenty-Five Year Century: A South Vietnamese General Remembers the Indochina War to the Fall of Saigon (2001), p. 156
  • In the Pacific we gave our enemies a costly lesson in amphibious warfare, just as in Europe we, with our allies, demonstrated successful coalition warfare. The performance of all branches of the services in Europe under General Eisenhower, in the central and southern Pacific under Admiral Nimitz, and in the southwestern Pacific under General MacArthur brought glory to themselves and to their country.
    • William D. Leahy, I Was There (1950), p. 439
  • [MacArthur’s «Old Soldiers Never Die» speech was of] such a superlative quality of excellence… that there is no other individual… capable of preparing and delivering a comparable address… The public enthusiasm for General MacArthur in San Francisco and in Washington was a triumph beyond anything that I have ever seen anywhere for anybody, which seems strange in view of his recent summary detachment by President Truman. If the general’s popularity persists for a considerable time, it should actively effect a change in the country’s domestic political policy, and it might have a radical effect on the complexion of domestic political development. From a purely military point of view it appears that General MacArthur’s attitude will be fully accepted by all qualified military authorities.
    • William D. Leahy, as quoted by Henry H. Adams in Witness to Power: The Life of Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy (1985), p. 341
  • Korea was a sideshow for me. Truman and later Eisenhower both negotiated the peace treaty, which I thought was bullshit, because there was no way the North could sustain the pain and suffering that we could inflict from the air. I also doubted that the Russians would go into full war mode over North Korea, even if I vaporized China. Omar Bradley agreed with me, and he said that «Ike is a politician now, not a soldier.» Just like my plan for the Soviet Union, I would have bombed their air bases, industrial sites, and military installations, and after the first few waves did not get the point across, a single tactical atomic drop would have definitely made the point. Sadly, [Major General] Orvil Anderson proposed the same method, and was fired for his objective yet, in my opinion, very astute opinion. But after the Chinese came into it, that was what really got MacArthur relieved of his command. He thought like me on that level: just destroy the fuckers and end this stupid shit. Truman was not of that mind-set, and neither was Ike. I think both feared that such a bold move would force the Russians into it. Stalin had just died, and there was a new Soviet leadership. We knew and understood how Stalin thought, but we did not have a lot of intel on the new head honcho, Nikita Krushchev. He would become a prick, too.
    • Curtis LeMay, as quoted by Colin Heaton and Anne-Marie Lewis, Above The Reich: Deadly Dogfights, Blistering Bombing Raids, and Other War Stories from the Greatest American Air Heroes of World War II, in Their Own Words (2021), p. 336
  • MacArthur was imperialistic, almost self-godlike, and he always remained aloof from his soldiers. You were never going to see old Mac sitting in the damned mud, swatting flies and mosquitoes, eating rancid chow in a pouring tropical rain. Oh no. His ass was in a nice house or office with water buffalo steaks and red wine. I have to say that he was just about the only senior flag officer I can say that about, personal experience. All the others I have mentioned shared the misery, even Patton. He lived well per his rank, but he gave up his jeep to send wounded men back to an aid station in Sicily and walked on foot as the Germans shot at his men.
    • Curtis LeMay, as quoted by Colin Heaton and Anne-Marie Lewis, Above The Reich: Deadly Dogfights, Blistering Bombing Raids, and Other War Stories from the Greatest American Air Heroes of World War II, in Their Own Words (2021), p. 349-350
  • In the early 1920s his chauffeur was driving him along the west bank of the Hudson when a man with a flashlight stepped into the road and waved them to a stop. Producing a pistol, he demanded the brigadier’s wallet. «You don’t get it as easy as that,» MacArthur said. «I’ve got around forty dollars, but you’ll have to whip me to get it. I’m coming out of this car, and I’ll fight you for it.» The thug threatened to kill him. MacArthur said, «Sure, you can shoot me, but if you do they’ll run you down and fry you in the big house. Put down that gun, and I’ll come out and fight you fair and square for my money. My name is MacArthur, and I live —» The man lowered his gun. He said, «My God, why didn’t you tell me that in the first place? Why, I was in the Rainbow. I was a sergeant in Wild Bill Donovan’s outfit. My God, General, I’m sorry. I apologize.» MacArthur told his driver to proceed, and when he reached West Point he made no attempt to notify the police.
    • William Manchester, in his book American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur 1880-1964 (1978), p. 114-115
  • Back and forth the fantastic tableaux would spin, past his cruel plebe hazing, the self-discovery at the West Texas Military Academy, the patriarchal Judge MacArthur, all beard and cigar smoke, presiding over dynastic feats at Washington’s 1201 N Street; the chimes of the drawing-room clock there telling off the quarters; the ceremonial changing of the guard at Leavenworth; his father’s tales of Sherman’s dauntless Boys in Blue; his mother’s imperious commands to fight and fight and never lower his blade short of victory; the clean crack of Krag rifles and the warm prickling of desert sand as he played with his brother outside the fort stockade; the rumbling of the sunset gun and Pinky’s face tilting downward, her lambent smile gilding the child’s upturned features while he clutched at her cascading skirts; the yellow notes of the bugles as he stirred in his cradle; the chant of sergeants hawking cadence on the parade ground outside; and, snapping proudly in the overarching sky above him, the flag, and the flag, and the flag.
    • William Manchester, in his book American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur 1880-1964 (1978), p. 709
  • History gives us ample precedence for making decisions at the speed of relevance. In 1941, General Douglas MacArthur was planning a landing in the Southwest Pacific. He wrote to Admiral William Halsey, in charge of the South Pacific, asking for a naval campaign to divert the Japanese forces. Only two days later, Halsey wrote back, pledging his support. There was no need for extended exchanges between staffs. The shared objective was to shatter the Japanese forces. All else was secondary. Two strong-willed commanders collaborated to unleash hell upon the enemy.
    • James Mattis, Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead (2019), p. 57-58
  • In 1931 a new chief of staff, the charismatic Douglas MacArthur, began to shift War Department priorities toward modernizing and training only the most active portions of the Army of the United States. A controversial officer noted for his imperious treatment of existing Army plans and values, MacArthur directed the General Staff to focus on specific war plans or «probable conflicts» and to increase the president’s ability to order a partial mobilization on a discretionary basis, meaning free of congressional interference. By 1934 the General Staff had consolidated the paper army active and reserve into a twenty-two division force, organized into four field armies, of regulars and National Guardsmen. Instead of emphasizing the organization of a mass army to protect the United States from invasion, MacArthur wanted the War Department’s funds to go to an «Initial Protective Force» of 400,000 soldiers that could respond to a real crisis, especially a war with Japan. Continued by his successor, Malin Craig, MacArthur’s approach- the Protective Mobilization Plan- included a series of six-year programs designed to modernize the regular Army and Guard. The latter force made steady progress in the interwar period, for in 1924 the federal government began to pay the Guardsmen for weekly drills. In 1933 additional legislation ensured that mobilized Guard units would not be broken up and required that Guard officers hold federal reserve commissions and meet regular Army standards in order to draw drill pay.
    • Allan R. Millett, Peter Maslowski, and William B. Feis, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States From 1607 to 2012 (2012), p. 356
  • Bitterly disappointed by his defeat at the hands of the Chinese, MacArthur pressured the administration to accept his own war aims. Marshaling heroic rhetoric- «There is no substitute for victory»- the general conducted a political campaign to open Communist China to direct attack by his own forces and the Chinese Nationalists. He continued to hint darkly about the use of nuclear weapons, an option Truman never seriously considered. Incident mounted after incident: Indiscreet press conferences, unauthorized contacts with Chiang Kai-shek, inappropriate challenges to the Communists, provocative correspondence with veterans’ groups and Republican congressional leaders, dark hints of treason by the UN allies, especially Britain. With the full approval of Acheson, the new Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall, and the JCS, Truman finally relieved MacArthur and ordered him home in April 1951. Buoyed by his enthusiastic public reception and bathed in martyrdom, MacArthur took his case to Congress.
    • Allan R. Millett, Peter Maslowski, and William B. Feis, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States From 1607 to 2012 (2012), p. 460
  • In a memorable public address to both houses, he accused the administration of appeasement and defeatism before promising to fade away like an old soldier in a barracks ballad. Like most MacArthur predictions, the promise to disappear proved flawed, since the Senate held hearings on the war and defense policy. MacArthur produced harsh words and limited enlightenment but could not reverse the administration’s policy of limiting the war. As JCS Chairman General of the Army Omar Bradley stated, MacArthur’s wider war was «the wrong war, war at the wrong place, at the wrong time, with the wrong enemy.» The concept that a theater commander could dictate global policy seemed to endanger the principle of civilian control as well as the professional stature of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Acutely aware that MacArthur’s proposals endangered his rearmament program and the development of NATO, Truman summed up the issue: «General MacArthur was ready to risk general war. I was not.» MacArthur faded away after a weak showing in the early presidential primaries of 1952. The war went on without him.
    • ** Allan R. Millett, Peter Maslowski, and William B. Feis, For the Common Defense: A Military History of the United States From 1607 to 2012 (2012), p. 460
  • Japan fared no better [than Germany]. The United States took over the country, installed a military dictatorship under General Douglas MacArthur, and ruled the country with an iron fist. It is no accident that William Manchester titled his biography of MacArthur American Caesar. That MacArthur ruled wisely is a testimony to his observance of American heritage and democratic principles but should not obscure the fact that his rule was total. MacArthur ruled like a neocolonial military dictator possessing complete executive and legislative authority. «I could by fiat issue directives,» he informed the U.S. Senate, and he did.
    • Seymour Morris Jr., American History Revised: 200 Startling Facts That Never Made It into the Textbooks (2010), p. 291-292
  • Many years before Harry Truman fired General Douglas MacArthur, there was another prima donna general, the renowned John C. Frémont. For issuing orders authorizing the emancipation of slaves in Missouri without presidential permission, Lincoln fired him on the spot. As for MacArthur, he should have known better: the same thing had also happened to his own father. Back in the early 1900s, General Arthur MacArthur, military governor of the Philippines, made the stupid mistake of not recognizing the superior authority of the civilian governor, William Howard Taft, who later became president. Years later, when MacArthur’s turn came to be promoted to Army Chief of Staff, Taft blackballed him.
    • Seymour Morris Jr., American History Revised: 200 Startling Facts That Never Made It into the Textbooks (2010), p. 314-315
  • Because Douglas MacArthur disliked, mistrusted, and resented George Marshall it should not be thought that his prejudices were reciprocated. They were not, and maybe that was the trouble. For almost the whole of these two men’s lives and professional careers, they had shared the same vocation, served in the same Army, fought in the same wars. Wherever in the world GI boots had stamped to attention, they both had taken the salute, watched a regiment march-past, celebrated a soldierly anniversary. There was no battlefield where U.S. troops had fought on which they had not ducked the same shellfire, dodged the same bullets, faced the same setbacks, savored the same victories. It was true that fate had ordained that it was MacArthur who commanded the vast armies in the field and Marshall who stayed behind to manipulate the martial pieces on the global chessboard. But if any envy had been engendered as a result, surely it should have been on Marshall’s part. Like the director who masterminds the movements of crew, cameras, and cast, it was Marshall, the «organizer of victory,» as Churchill called him, who might have been expected to show resentment when the limelight was focused elsewhere. By no word of gesture had he ever done so.
    • Leonard Mosely, Marshall: Hero for Our Times (1982), p. 484
  • In fact, however, the «antagonism» was entirely one-sided, and never once did Marshall harm MacArthur either as a man or as a soldier. On the other hand, MacArthur seemed to take pleasure in damaging Marshall’s career. It was he, while Chief of Staff during the interwar years, who had deliberately blocked Marshall’s advancement. It was he who had sneered at his appointment as Chief of Staff when WWII began. It was Marshall he blamed for starving him of supplies during the Pacific campaigns, sneered at him as a chairborne soldier, a Roosevelt stooge. Then he would add, «And no friend of mine.» Marshall must have known all about these snide remarks on MacArthur’s part. Not only did he ignore them, but he never once allowed them to influence the respect in which he held the Far East commander or to deflect him from giving him all the support and protection of which he had need. Twice during WWII he saved him from what, for MacArthur, would have been a fate worse than death- obscurity.
    • Leonard Mosely, Marshall: Hero for Our Times (1982), p. 485
  • The U.S. Navy hated MacArthur, really hated him. Early in the Pacific War it began agitating for an overall command in the area, the idea being to get MacArthur and his troops under its control. Believing Marshall to share their antipathy, the Navy enlisted his support and was delighted when he appeared to give it. «But on one condition,» he said. «If we’re going to have an overall commander in the Pacific, there isn’t any question about it, you will have to pick MacArthur- on the basis of pure competence alone.» The Navy abruptly abandoned the idea. Later, when the Navy wished to bypass the liberation of the Philippines in favor of operations against Formosa, it was Marshall who again intervened to insist MacArthur be allowed to fulfill his pledge to the Philippine people, to whom he had vowed, «I shall return.» He was given the go-ahead to do so, and, of course, was hailed as the greatest hero of the Pacific war.
    • Leonard Mosely, Marshall: Hero for Our Times (1982), p. 485
Washington and Grant and Lee were all tried and true
Eisenhower, Bradley, and MacArthur, too
They will live forevermore, ’till the world is done with war
Then they’ll close that final door, fading away

  • Vaughan Monroe, in his 1951 song Old Soldiers Never Die, which was named after MacArthur’s speech.
  • King remained unconvinced that the Philippines should be the principal force of a Central Pacific campaign. He, in fact, agreed with MacArthur that the original War Plan Orange made little sense, since there was no beleaguered American force in Manila Bay to rescue. The only thing in need of rescue was MacArthur’s beleaguered reputation, and King saw no point in doing that either, since liberating Luzon would simply kill thousands of Japanese and Filipinos, not to mention American soldiers, without any important impact on Japan’s air and naval power or industrial activity. King expressed his doubts by challenging the selection of Palau as an objective and pointing instead to Formosa as a safer place than the Philippines to interdict Japanese overseas trade.
    • Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War To Be Won: Fighting the Second World War (2000), p. 339
  • If the disaster at Malaya discredited the British Empire, the doomed defense of the Philippines turned an American general, Douglas MacArthur, into an international hero and ensured that the future war with Japan would be fought under his influence. It was one of the most bizarre twists of World War II, for MacArthur made a defeat look like a victory of sorts, largely because of the dogged resistance of his common soldiers against what appeared to be overwhelming odds. A pioneer in army public relations even before World War I, MacArthur had already established his credentials as a hero of the Republican Party, an opponent of American subversives from the Right and Left (mostly left), a champion of the Chinese and Filipinos, and an outspoken critic of the British influence on American foreign policy. One of his contemporaries characterized him as the greatest actor ever to serve in the U.S. Army, and another observed that MacArthur did not have a staff but a court. His behavior under stress- including combat- confounded worshipers and detractors alike; he could be absolutely insensitive to danger, yet he also shrank from direct contact with combat troops, especially the sick and wounded. He had a habit of becoming ill at times of crisis, and his behavior even when he was young (and in 1941 he was sixty) suggested chemical depression and a tendency to hyperventilate and vomit. He always kept a physician in close attendance, and he observed his meal and rest schedule with the precision of a Swiss watchmaker. Without doubt, he understood American politics and the role of the media in shaping policy. FDR once characterized MacArthur as one of the two most dangerous demagogues in American politics, the other being Huey Long.
    • Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War To Be Won: Fighting the Second World War (2000), p. 181-182
  • MacArthur always knew he was at the center of the world stage, and he had no intention of allowing the Philippines to fall without a struggle of legendary proportions. The very real difficulties he faced were daunting enough, and it is doubtful that he or any other American general could have saved the islands, but his own and others’ errors put his forces at grave risk from the very first day of war.
    • Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett, A War To Be Won: Fighting the Second World War (2000), p. 182
  • For Douglas MacArthur, exile was more Elba than Saint Helena, not Washington and the White House but the Waldorf and New York City- both certainly bearable. He never meant to stay, yet settled in comfortably. First Army Headquarters in Lower Manhattan gave him a four-room office suite, and each morning he arrived to read the cable traffic. Later in the day he and Jean might be seen prowling the smart shops along Fifth Avenue, lunching at someplace elegant, followed, perhaps, by a night on Broadway or at a sporting event, seated in the owner’s box, cheering on Gotham’s teams with the intensity of a teen, especially if it was Jackie Robinson, his favorite and most admired athlete. On the other hand, nanny Ah Chue never went out, becoming a Waldorf recluse, while little Arthur quietly drifted into his own world of music and anonymity, choosing Columbia, not West Point, and eventually living under an assumed name, his father’s persona too much for him.
    • Robert L. O’Connell, Team America: Patton, MacArthur, Marshall, Eisenhower, and the World They Forged (2022). New York: HarperCollins Publishers, p. 479
  • But he was still not finished. If his body was weakening, his mind remained strong, and in October he began to compose his memoirs. Sitting in he same chair, he filled hundreds of legal pads with virtually no cross-outs or erasures before he was finished the following August. The result of the ten-month marathon, Reminiscences, was pure MacArthur, and also an excellent summary of his life, if you weren’t interested in his first marriage, which he left out entirely. But that didn’t bother conservative publishing magnate Henry Luce, who bought the rights to be serialized in seven installments for Life magazine and then presented in book form, for a cool $900,000 (almost $8,000,000 in 2022). Reviews were predictably mostly anti-Mac, but the book sold well and probably earned Luce his money back.
    It was MacArthur’s last kudo. Lifelong good health had taught him to avoid doctors, and by this time his liver was shot. There was nothing left but the one-way ticket to Walter Reed in early March 1964. he lasted just over a month, dying of biliary cirrhosis on April 5.
    No surprise, Doug left elaborate instructions for his funeral, which Kennedy’s successor, Lyndon Johnson, only elaborated on, leading to a three-stage event. It began in Manhattan with a public viewing and televised procession wheeling the coffin to a special train, which then took it to Washington. There it lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda, with 150,000 people filing past, before it was taken to Pinky’s hometown, Norfolk, Virginia, where the old city hall had been turned into the Douglas MacArthur Memorial. Here, in an elaborate sepulcher, he was laid to rest, joined finally by Jean, who continued living in the Waldorf Towers until she died at the age of 101.
    • Robert L. O’Connell, Team America: Patton, MacArthur, Marshall, Eisenhower, and the World They Forged (2022). New York: HarperCollins Publishers, p. 481
  • I was still in Europe at the time. Truman said he had the authority to relieve him and he did it. I have never made up my mind whether he was right or not, but I happened to be with a British unit the night we learned of MacArthur’s dismissal. The British had a brigade in Korea at the time and the British officers in the Mess were very anti-MacArthur and celebrating his demise. I think MacArthur was a magnificent general, but he became more and more insulated from the world by his staff, many of whom had been with him since the Bataan days. I think that was part of the problem. He was not a young man at the time of Korea. I think, perhaps, he got too dependent on his staff officers and certain things happened which were not in MacArthur’s best interest… Even after MacArthur was relieved by the President of the United States he had a tickertape parade in New York City and he made two great speeches, one to Congress and one about Duty, Honor, Country. The Duty, Honor, Country speech is one of the greatest ever made by a military man, and he made it without a note at the age of seventy-five. I believe Douglas MacArthur in 1945 could have come home and run for president and won going away. He was worshipped at the end of the war.
    • George S. Patton, IV, as quoted in The Fighting Pattons (1997) by Brian M. Sobel, p. 66-67
  • He carried a different level of prestige. I don’t think anybody would fool with him. MacArthur was MacArthur and everybody was subordinate to MacArthur. For his part and with regard to leadership, MacArthur commanded a theater, and of course his responsibilities far transcended those of my dads. He was a superb leader and was probably the greatest general this country has ever produced.
    • George S. Patton, IV, as quoted in The Fighting Pattons (1997) by Brian M. Sobel, p. 222
  • No man of our time is more authentically the voice of real America than Douglas MacArthur. To the millions who lined the streets of our great cities to cheer and weep as he passed by, he is the personification of the American tradition and history. As he rode up great avenues ‘midst vast throngs, the people through misty eyes saw in him the noble leaders of the past- Washington, Lee, Grant. And when he addressed the Congress of the United States, once again Americans heard the great truths which many, starved for them, never expected to hear again, and those who never heard them before wept unashamedly. In this stalwart, romantic figure, the great hopes, dreams and ideals of our country come to life again. He stimulates renewed faith that the land of Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln still lives in the hearts of the people. I shall never forget the light on General MacArthur’s face and the deep feeling in his voice when he said to me — «They are a wonderful people — the American people — quick, impulsive, generous, whole-hearted! You can always trust in them and believe in them, for in their hearts they are good and true; in a crisis, they will do the right thing.»
    • Norman Vincent Peale, D.D., in the introduction to Revitalizing A Nation: A Statement of Beliefs, Opinions, and Policies Embodied in the Public Announcements of General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (1952) by The Heritage Foundation, Inc., p. 5
  • MacArthur’s most obvious trait was his vanity, which is often seized on as if it were the key to the man. It seems to me, however, that while MacArthur was infuriatingly vain, was egotistical, was fascinated by himself, he was not in the deepest sense ego-driven. The motor that powered his ascent was his amazing willpower, the same willpower that made him control his body under fire, that made him study his way to the top at West Point, that made him impose his strategy on a reluctant government in World War II. MacArthur’s parents had planted a vision of himself in the deepest, richest soil of his character. That vision never changed from childhood to old age. He had a destiny to fulfill. The thirst for medals, trophies, publicity, flattery and an adoring staff was vanity, but more than vanity. These were his compass bearings, the way he confirmed that he was on the right track to his destination. But it was implacable, inexhaustible will that was the engine taking him toward his goal. it was that will that made him a difficult subordinate and distanced him from other men — at times even distanced him from himself — yet it finally got him where he intended to go.
    • Geoffrey Perret, Old Soldiers Never Die: The Life of Douglas MacArthur (1996), p. 588-589
  • Even allowing for the failures, the disappointments, the scorn and rebuffs, wasn’t MacArthur, as William Manchester claims, the greatest soldier in American history? Not in my view. MacArthur was too difficult a subordinate to be an entirely successful commander. He created far more problems for Marshall, Stimson, Roosevelt and Truman than any general has the right to make, especially in time of war. He also spent time and energy toying with political ambitions when everything that was in him should have gone into fighting the enemy. At best he was probably the second-greatest soldier in American history, second only, that is, to Ulysses S. Grant. And along the way he did lead the most adventurous and dramatic life in American history, which makes him a gift to biographers and a subject of enduring interest to Americans.
    • Geoffrey Perret, Old Soldiers Never Die: The Life of Douglas MacArthur (1996), p. 589
  • Douglas MacArthur was the last great 19th century soldier, while George Marshall was the first great 20th century soldier.
    • Mark A. Stoler, Board of Trustees of the Society for Military History[citation needed]
  • During the year just past there came to this country from across the sea a man — a leader of men. He was a tall man, clear of eye, imposing in stature and lofty in mien who had met and wrestled with this «greatest scourge of mankind» and who understands fully the determining concepts and the motivating forces of international Communism. He shapes his every utterance, act and deed in consonance with this understanding. He is a man of such broad vision and knowledge that the Atlantic Ocean becomes merely a peaceful lake, although enclosed by the shores of continents, and the broad Pacific, a benign moat but on which can be carried the thriving commerce of billions of men. This man has such a knowledge of the historical past and such an insight into a divinely ordained future that he fashions the deeds of today to mesh with a tomorrow of one thousand years from now. This man is known to the world as General of the Army Douglas MacArthur.
    • John M. Pratt, in the foreword chapter «Revitalizing a Nation», in the book Revitalizing A Nation: A Statement of Beliefs, Opinions, and Policies Embodied in the Public Announcements of General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (1952) by The Heritage Foundation, Inc., p. 7-8
  • On April 12, 1951, General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in the Pacific, was relieved of his command, stripped of all authority and ordered to leave Japan. He was dismissed with as little consideration as though he had been a new office boy found pilfering pennies from the cash register. Apparently it was intended that he be humiliated and that he return disgraced. General MacArthur had to his credit 52 years of loyal and unquestioned service. He was a soldier. He obeyed orders. He returned to his native land, but not as a broken, beaten soldier. He was a «Daniel come to judgement» — with a vibrant message that thrilled, inspired and re-created hope in the hearts of his countrymen. He began the task of revitalizing the nation.
    • John M. Pratt, in the foreword chapter «Revitalizing a Nation», in the book Revitalizing A Nation: A Statement of Beliefs, Opinions, and Policies Embodied in the Public Announcements of General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (1952) by The Heritage Foundation, Inc., p. 9
  • Not since the beginning of the war has a story been so overplayed and commercialized as General MacArthur’s defense of Bataan. It is natural and desirable that we should play up the activities of our own generals and especially a general of the caliber of MacArthur. But in the interests of a well-informed public opinion it is essential that we maintain some semblance of proportion. What was gained by giving the impression that the arrival of General MacArthur in Australia foreshadowed the beginning of a great offensive against Japan? What is the point of carrying dispatches about Australia’s being «built into a great Allied fortress»? How does one build into a «great Allied fortress» a continent almost exactly the size of continental United States? This kind of editing merely plays into the hands of our enemies… The defense of Bataan was doomed from the start, as every responsible newspaperman knew, yet many papers raised up the hopes by failing to put the story in its proper perspective. The defense of Bataan and the siege of Corregidor were comparable in this war to the siege of Tobruk, and they did not compare in importance to the defense of Malta. Yet who can tell the name of the commander who held Tobruk or the leader of the men at Malta?
    • James B. Reston, Prelude to Victory (1942), p. 127-128
  • With his flamboyant headgear, his sunglasses and corn cob pipe, he looked like an actor playing the role of a great general. He also had the sort of press an actor likes; he arranged that, in part, by keeping his subordinates as anonymous as possible. But the truth was that Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in the Southwest Pacific, was a great general. He had one of the most distinguished military careers on record (top of his class at West Point, a hero in the first war, Army Chief of Staff), and it is doubtful that anyone in any of the services knew more about the Pacific theater. Nonetheless, the war that would be waged to return him to the Philippines, as he had promised, would be a Navy war, and [three admirals] — Nimitz, King, and Halsey — would have every bit as much to do with the strategy and tactics of winning that war as he had.
    • C.L. Sulzberger, in his book The American Heritage Picture History of World War II (1966), p. 335
  • McVay and the Indianapolis were about to sail from he Marianas Sea Frontier into the Philippine Sea Frontier, and it was like passing between two different worlds. A ship moved from one frontier to the other by crossing the Chop, a boundary marked by the 130-degree line of longitude. Clear as this delineation was, there was a complicating factor: communications in this area were often confused by a political battle between Admiral Nimitz and General MacArthur, who were locked in a struggle to control the Navy. MacArthur, in charge of the Seventh Fleet, wanted to unite it with the Army. Nimitz, commander of the Pacific Fleet, wanted to remain autonomous. In the end, Nimitz had been given control of the entire Pacific naval operation, but friction between the two military titans still existed. Information about a ship’s whereabouts, or other crucial facts, sometimes got lost in the fallout. This could mean trouble for the Indianapolis, which sometimes relied on the presence of carefully-timed escorts to protect her from enemy submarines and spirit her out of danger.
    • Doug Stanton, In Harm’s Way (2001), p. 74
  • I graduated on June 13, number 4 in a class of 102. General MacArthur gave me my diploma and his «Congratulations, Mr. Taylor» was the last time I heard his voice until, as the new Chief of Staff of the Army, I called on him in the Waldorf Towers in 1956. Although he had done much for the Corps of Cadets during his superintendency, oddly enough he had never made an effort to impress his personality on the cadets through direct communication with them. I do not ever recall his having made a speech to us and only a few cadets were ever asked to his house. Certainly no graduate has left greater evidence of deep affection for West Point and the Corps than MacArthur, but the cadets saw little of this during his superintendency.
    • Maxwell D. Taylor, United States Military Academy Class of 1922, in his book Swords and Plowshares (1972), p. 28
  • I fired him because he wouldn’t respect the authority of the president. That’s the answer to that. I didn’t fire him because he was a dumb son of a bitch, although he was, but that’s not against the law for generals. If it was, half to three-quarters of them would be in jail.
    • Harry S. Truman, quoted in Plain Speaking : An Oral Biography of Harry S Truman (1974) by Merle Mille
  • Nothing but a damn bunch of bullshit!
    • Harry S. Truman on MacArthur’s «Old Soldiers Never Die» speech, as quoted in The Fifties (1993) by David Halberstam
  • This has been a hectic month. General Mac, as usual has been shooting off his mouth. He made a preelection statement that cost us votes and he made a postelection statement that has him in hot water in Europe and at home. I must defend him and save his face even if he has tried on various and numerous occasions to cut mine off. But I must stand by my subordinates…
    • Harry S. Truman, in a November 30, 1950 entry on his calendar, as quoted by Margaret Truman in her book Harry S. Truman (1972), p. 493
  • On November 6, the day before the 1950 elections, General MacArthur issued a demand to bomb the Yalu River bridges. Men and material were pouring across them and he said, «This movement not only jeopardizes but threatens the ultimate destruction of the forces under my command.» With great reluctance, Dad gave him permission to destroy the Korean end of the bridges. But General Bradley pointed out to my father that within fifteen to twenty days the Yalu would be frozen, and the bombardment, so frantically insisted upon by General MacArthur, was hardly worth the risk of bombs dropping in Chinese or Soviet territory. The following day General MacArthur reported that enemy planes were engaging in hit-and-run raids across the Yalu and demanded the right to pursue them into their «sanctuary.» Panic reigned in the UN until my father categorically rejected this request, which could only have widened the war. General MacArthur did not seem to realize that our planes were flying from privileged sanctuaries in Japan which could have been attacked by Russian or Chinese aircraft if we gave them the pretext by bombing targets in Manchuria.
    • Margaret Truman, Harry S. Truman (1972), p. 490
  • After sounding the alarm about Chinese intervention in the gravest possible terms, General MacArthur now did a complete flip-flop. He decided that he could resume his advance to the Yalu. The Joint Chiefs nervously asked him to remember that he was under orders to use only Republic of Korea troops in these northern provinces. General MacArthur replied that he was using Americans for the advance but would withdraw them as soon as he had cleared the area. This was a definite act of insubordination. But the Joint Chiefs were far more worried about MacArthur’s appalling strategy. He had divided his army into two parts, sending one up the eastern side of Korea, the other up the west, separated by a massive mountain barrier that made liaison impossible. He called it a «general offensive» to «win the war» and predicted that the troops will «eat Christmas dinner at home.» In one communiqué he described his advance as «a massive compression envelopment.» In another report he called it «the giant U.N. pincer.»
    • Margaret Truman, Harry S. Truman (1972), p. 491
  • Everyone feared that MacArthur was plunging toward disaster, but no one had the courage to speak out. Finally, General Ridgway, who was not a member of the Joint Chiefs and therefore without a vote, asked for permission to speak. He declared that they owed it «to the men in the field and the God to whom we must answer for these men’s lives to stop talking and to act.» The only answer he received was silence. Later, General Ridgway buttonholed General Hoyt Vandenberg, commander of the Air Force. «Why don’t the Joint Chiefs send orders to MacArthur and tell him what to do?» Vandenberg shook his head. «What good would that do? He wouldn’t obey the orders. What can we do?» «You can relieve any commander who won’t obey orders, can’t you?» General Ridgway exclaimed. General Vandenberg gave General Ridgway a look that was, Ridgway says «both puzzled and amazed.» Then he walked away without saying a word.
    • Margaret Truman, Harry S. Truman (1972), p. 491-492
  • General MacArthur was fond of saying that he had a policy, and President Truman had no policy. But when he testified before Senator Russell’s committee, it became quite clear that the shoe was on the other foot. One senator asked him, «Assume we embrace your program, and assume the Chinese were chased back across the Yalu River, and suppose they then refused to sign a treaty, and to enter into an agreement on what their future course will be, what course would you recommend at that stage? General MacArthur had nothing to recommend. «I don’t think they could remain in a state of belligerency,» he replied grandly. He had no solution to the problem of maintaining an army across 420 miles of northern Korea, compared to the 110 miles of front we were required to defend along the 38th parallel. He admitted it would be madness to invade Manchuria and begin an all-out war with China’s 400 million people. Where did this leave General MacArthur’s much-quoted phrase, There is no substitute for victory?» It was Harry S. Truman who had a policy. General MacArthur was nothing more than a collection of disorganized ideas.
    • Margaret Truman, Harry S. Truman (1972), p. 518-519
  • Not a simple man!
    • Unnamed Japanese statesman to John Gunther in 1950, as quoted in the preface of American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur 1880-1964 (1978)
  • It was a mistake ever to visualize a landing in force against the Japanese main islands. Such an attack would have cost us a tremendous number of lives and was not necessary. The Japanese lived by the sea, and once their Navy, shipping, and Air Force were destroyed it was certain that they could be starved into surrender. MacArthur and Nimitz could have maintained a tight blockade around the islands ad infinitum. Fortunately the war ended before OLYMPIC, the actual invasion of Japan, was ever mounted.
    • Albert C. Wedemeyer, Wedemeyer Reports! (1958), p. 428

Award Citations[edit]

On a field where courage was the rule, his courage was the dominant feature.
He has so inspired his command by his vision, his judgment, his indomitable will and his unshakeable faith, that he has set a shining example of gallantry and tenacity in defense and of audacity in attack matched by but few operations in military history. His conduct has been in accord with the highest traditions of the military service of the United States, and is deserving of the enduring gratitude of the freedom-loving peoples of the world.
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Brigadier General (Corps of Engineers) Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as Chief of Staff, 42d Division, A.E.F., in the Salient-du-Feys, France, 9 March 1918. When Company D, 168th Infantry, was under severe attack in the salient du Feys, France, General MacArthur voluntarily joined it, upon finding that he could do so without interfering with his normal duties, and by his coolness and conspicuous courage aided materially in its success.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s first Distinguished Service Cross. War Department, General Orders No. 27 (1919)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Brigadier General (Corps of Engineers) Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as Chief of Staff, 42d Division, A.E.F., near Cote-de-Chatillon, France, October 14 — 16, 1918: As brigade commander General MacArthur personally led his men and by the skillful maneuvering of his brigade made possible the capture of Hills 288, 242, and the Cote-de-Chatillon, France, 14 — 16 October 1918. He displayed indomitable resolution and great courage in rallying broken lines and in reforming attacks, thereby making victory possible. On a field where courage was the rule, his courage was the dominant feature.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s second Distinguished Service Cross. War Department, General Orders No. 27 (1919)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Brigadier General Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility during World War I. General MacArthur served with credit as Chief of Staff of the 42d Division in the operations at Chalons and at the Chateau-Thierry salient. In command of the 84th Infantry Brigade, he showed himself to be a brilliant commander of skill and judgment. Later he served with distinction as Commanding General of the 42d Division.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s first Distinguished Service Medal. War Department, General Orders No. 59 (1919)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Army Distinguished Service Medal to General Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility. As Chief of Staff of the Army of the United States from 21 November 1930 to 1 October 1935, General MacArthur performed his many important and exacting duties with signal success. He devised and developed the Four-Army organization of our land forces; he conceived and established the GHQ Air Force, thus immeasurably increasing the effectiveness of our air defenses; he initiated a comprehensive program of modernization in the Army’s tactics, equipment, training, and organization. In addition, the professional counsel and assistance he continuously rendered to the President, to the Secretary of War, and to the Congress were distinguished by such logic, vision, and accuracy as to contribute markedly to the formulation of sound defense policies and the enactment of progressive laws for promoting the Nation’s security.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s second Distinguished Service Medal. War Department, General Orders No. 7 (1935)
  • The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for conspicuous leadership in preparing the Philippine Islands to resist conquest, for gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action against invading Japanese forces, and for the heroic conduct of defensive and offensive operations on the Bataan Peninsula. General MacArthur mobilized, trained, and led an army which has received world acclaim for its gallant defense against a tremendous superiority of enemy forces in men and arms. His utter disregard of personal danger under heavy fire and aerial bombardment, his calm judgment in each crisis, inspired his troops, galvanized the spirit of resistance of the Filipino people, and confirmed the faith of the American people in their Armed Forces.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s Medal of Honor. It was the third time he had been nominated for the award, but the first time he had received it. Citation for the War Department, General Orders No. 16 (1 April 1942)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Army Distinguished Service Medal to General Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility as Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in the Southwest Pacific since March 1942. Under extremely difficult conditions of terrain, climate and limited forces and material he expelled the enemy from eastern New Guinea, secured lodgments on the Island of New Britain and gave strategic direction to coordinated operations resulting in the conquest of the New Georgia Group and the establishment of the United States Army and Navy forces on Bougainville Island. He has inflicted heavy losses on the enemy and established his forces in positions highly favorable for the construction of offensive operations.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s third Distinguished Service Medal. War Department, General Orders No. 10 (1944)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to General of the Army Douglas Macarthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy, in action against enemy forces on 26 January 1945, while visiting the 25th Division in combat at San Manuel, Luzon, Philippine Islands. On that date, General MacArthur advanced within 75 yards of the enemy lines to a point where two men had just been killed and several wounded by Japanese fire and which was still under heavy attack by enemy small arms, mortar, and cannon. Hidden enemy machine gunners and riflemen were opposing the advance with deliberately aimed cross-fire which intermittently covered the area. General MacArthur’s example in the face of enemy fire, was a source of inspiration to the men of the 25th Division and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s third Distinguished Service Cross. War Department, General Orders No. 46 (23 May 1946)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Army Distinguished Service Medal to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility, during the period 20 October 1944 to 4 July 1945. As Supreme Commander of Allied Air, Ground and Sea Forces in the Southwest Pacific, General of the Army Douglas MacArthur planned and personally directed the campaigns which resulted in the liberation of the Philippine Islands. Strongly entrenched and superior enemy forces were overwhelmed and completely destroyed in a series of decisive operations and exploiting U.S. Air and Sea superiority, coupled with the resolute and courageous fighting of the Ground Forces. The immediate result of the campaign was control of the China sea, the isolation of Japanese Forces in Burma, Malaysia and Indo-China and the termination of coastwise traffic supporting the Japanese Armies in Central and South China. The liberation of the Philippines began with the landings on Leyte on 20 October in which complete strategic surprise was achieved. After bitter fighting under most difficult conditions of weather and terrain, General MacArthur destroyed the Japanese forces which included the noted 1st Division of the Kvantung Army. Again surprising the enemy, General MacArthur moved his forces boldly up the Western Coast of the main Philippine Island and effected a landing on the shores of Lingayen Gulf on 9 January 1945. The flawless execution of this hazardous amphibious approach and landing so disorganized the enemy that in a series of deep thrusts Manila was liberated on 25 February. The fortress of Corregidor fell soon afterward in a brilliantly conceived and directed combined land, sea and air operation. By the end of June only isolated groups of enemy remained in Luzon. While the United States SIXTH Army was so engaged, EIGHTH Army units cleared the enemy from the Southern Islands in a series of amphibious operations. By 4 July organized resistance had terminated, completing the liberation of the Philippine Islands and the 17,000,000 inhabitants from Japanese domination. More than 300,000 dead and 7,000 prisoners were lost by the enemy, our casualties in killed, wounded and missing totaling 60, 628. Seventeen of our divisions had opposed and defeated twenty-three enemy divisions. The air, ground, and naval forces worked in complete unison to inflict this crushing disaster on the Japanese Army.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s fourth Distinguished Service Medal. Department of the Army, General Orders No. 27 (19 April 1948)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Fourth Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fifth Award of the Army Distinguished Service Medal to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for distinguished service to the peoples of the United States and the Republic of Korea, and to the peoples of all free nations. Having been designated as the first field commander of United Nations armed forces, and directed, in the common interest, to repel an armed attack upon the Republic of Korea and to restore international peace and security in the area, he has given these forces conspicuously brilliant and courageous leadership and discerning judgment of the highest order. Having been compelled to commit his troops to combat under extremely adverse conditions and against heavy odds in order to gain the time so imperatively needed for the build-up of his forces for the counter-offensive, he has so inspired his command by his vision, his judgment, his indomitable will and his unshakeable faith, that he has set a shining example of gallantry and tenacity in defense and of audacity in attack matched by but few operations in military history. His conduct has been in accord with the highest traditions of the military service of the United States, and is deserving of the enduring gratitude of the freedom-loving peoples of the world.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s fifth Distinguished Service Medal. Department of the Army, General Orders No. 39 (1950)
  • The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross (Air Force Award) to General of the Army Douglas MacArthur (ASN: 0-57), United States Army, for heroism while participating in aerial flight as Commander-in-Chief, Far East, and Commander-in-Chief, United Nations Command, during the period 29 June to 20 October 1950. On 29 June General MacArthur made a flight to Suwon, Korea, during which his aircraft was subjected to effective interception by hostile air action. Another friendly aircraft in the area was attacked and destroyed by enemy air immediately prior to General MacArthur’s landing, and the Suwon airstrip itself was bombed and strafed during the course of his visit. On 27 July he made a flight to Taegu, Korea, during which his aircraft was again subject to hostile air interception and at which time the ground situation in the immediate area was most precarious. On 29 September, General MacArthur made a flight to Kimpo, Korea, again under conditions presenting the threat of hostile air interception and while the Kimpo airfield itself was subject to hostile ground fire. On 20 October he made a flight to the Sukchon-Sunchon area of Korea in order to observe and supervise the para-drop of the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team. During this entire operation his aircraft was subject to attack by enemy aircraft known to be based at Sinuiju. These aerial flights in an unarmed aircraft were made by General MacArthur in furtherance of his mission as Commander of the United Nations forces in Korea. Each flight involved the risk of death or capture by the enemy. In General MacArthur’s case this risk was multiplied a hundred-fold in view of his personal stature and his position as Commander-in-Chief. That General MacArthur unhesitatingly took part in these extraordinarily important and dangerous missions is a further demonstration of the unfaltering devotion to duty which characterizes his every action as a leader. His conduct in these instances has been an outstanding source of inspiration to the men he commands. Throughout the Korean campaign the strategic concepts underlying General MacArthur’s command decisions have reflected a superb understanding of the most advantageous employment of air power and made possible the victory which is being achieved with minimum losses and unprecedented speed. By his heroism and extraordinary achievement, General Douglas MacArthur reflects the highest honor upon himself, the United Nations, and the Armed Forces of the United States.
    • Citation for MacArthur’s Distinguished Flying Cross. Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 93 (20 October 1950)

External links[edit]

Wikipedia
Wikipedia
Wikisource
Wikisource
Commons
Commons
  • The MacArthur Memorial — The MacArthur Memorial at Norfolk, Virginia
  • MacArthur at PBS.

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